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foreach my $f($query->param) {
    foreach my $v($query->param($f)) {
        switch($f) {
            case 'a' {
                switch($v) {
                    case 1 { code1; }
                    case 2 { code2; }
                    case 3 { code3; }
                }

            case 'b' {
                switch($v) {
                    case 1 { code4; }
                    case 2 { code5; }
                }

            case 'c' {
                switch($v) {
                    case 1 { code6; }
                    case 2 { code7; }
                    case 3 { code8; }
                    case 4 { code9; }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Looks pretty simple already. And it's hard to tell, since you are not showing what happens in the "code" section. –  TLP Jul 31 '11 at 19:38
1  
Every time you write code; does it denote a unique code block? If not then please update your question to show which code blocks are unique and which are duplicates. –  Dave Jul 31 '11 at 19:41
    
yes, it's a unique code for each case –  Lem0n Jul 31 '11 at 19:42
4  
A quick sidenote: as of Perl 5.12, the switch statement has been deprecated, and been replaced by given/when. –  Mike Jul 31 '11 at 19:53
4  
given/when were in 5.10, and you really should use them, not Switch.pm –  ysth Jul 31 '11 at 19:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Above all... DO NOT USE Switch.pm. If you are using Perl 5.10 or newer, given/when is a native switch statement.

A dispatch table is the solution you seek. http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=587072 describes dispatch tables, a technique for executing code via a hash based on some value matching the hash key.

Edit, example:

my %dispatch_table = (
    'a' => {
        '1' => sub { code1; },
        '2' => sub { code2; },
        '3' => sub { code3; },
    'b' => {
        '1' => \&some_sub,
        '2' => sub { code4; },
    }
)

if ( exists( $dispatch_table{$f} ) and exists( $dispatch_table{$f}{$v} ) ) {
    $dispatch_table{$f}{$v}->();
}
else {
    # some default
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was going to suggest dispatch tables, too. –  Dallaylaen Jul 31 '11 at 19:52
1  
@ysth, you don't "flush out" an answer, you "flesh out" an answer :-) urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=flush%20out –  tadmc Jul 31 '11 at 23:02
    
Ah, thanks, tadmc –  ysth Jul 31 '11 at 23:19
    
@tadmc, if it's a really bad answer, you might. –  cjm Aug 1 '11 at 3:26

Put it in a "dispatch table":

my %code = (
    a => {
        1 => sub { code1 },
        2 => sub { code2 },
        3 => sub { code3 },
    },
    b => {
        1 => sub { code4 },
        2 => sub { code5 },
    },
    c => {
        1 => sub { code6 },
        2 => sub { code7 },
        3 => sub { code8 },
        4 => sub { code9 },
    },
);

Then once you have $f and $v, call the correct subroutine:

$code{$f}{$v}->();
share|improve this answer
    
sorry mikegrb, I confused it with your answer when I came back to vote –  Lem0n Aug 2 '11 at 17:05

Depending on what you mean by "simplified", you might consider something like this (if you're sure that neither $f nor $v can contain a ','):

foreach my $f ($query->param) {
    foreach my $v ($query->param($f)) {
        switch ("$f,$v") {
            case "a,1" { code; }
            case "a,2" { code; }
            case "a,3" { code; }

            case "b,1" { code; }
            case "b,2" { code; }

            case "c,1" { code; }
            case "c,2" { code; }
            case "c,3" { code; }
            case "c,4" { code; }
        }
    }   
}

(I'm assuming that all the occurrences of code; are actually different.)

share|improve this answer
    
Why the restriction on the comma? If there was a $f such that $f equals "x,y" and there was a case "x,y,1" and "x,y,2" to address it, this would still work; wouldn't it? –  Dave Jul 31 '11 at 19:48
2  
@Dave: because you couldn't differentiate $f="x,y";$v="z" from $f="x";$v="y,z" –  ysth Jul 31 '11 at 19:59

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