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let's say I have two tables:

USERS:
User_Id
Hansen
Nilsen
Jensen
Bob

and

ORDERS:
O_Id    OrderDate   OrderPrice  Customer
1       2008/11/12  1000        Hansen
2       2008/10/23  1600        Nilsen
3       2008/09/02  700         Hansen
4       2008/09/03  300         Hansen
5       2008/08/30  2000        Jensen
6       2008/10/04  100         Nilsen

I want to do a query to show how many times a customer ordered, so it'd look like:

Customer    Orders
Hansen      3
Nilsen      2
Jensen      1
Bob         0

I know I have to use the COUNT function, but I am at a loss as to how to finish this query off...

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You should use a chaotic primary key (AUTO_INCREMENT integer) in USERS table and refer to that identifier in ORDERS table. Joining on integer is "much easier" for the database than joining on a string. –  Shi Jul 31 '11 at 21:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted
SELECT     Customer, COUNT(*) AS Orders 
FROM         ORDERS  RIGHT OUTER JOIN
                      USERS ON USERS.User_Id = ORDERS.Customer
GROUP BY USERS.User_Id
ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC
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the problem is, this leaves bob out... –  pennstatephil Jul 31 '11 at 21:23
    
@pennstatephil: edited my answer. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 31 '11 at 21:27
    
that did it, thank you! –  pennstatephil Jul 31 '11 at 21:32

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