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I have a generic collection that contains a method that the items in the collection need to call. Each item has a reference to the generic collection. The problem is that I can't use the type of each item as the type passed to the generic collection.

The idea is like this (I know it doesn't compile):

    public class MyCollection<T>
    {
        public void Call(T item) { ... }
    }

    public abstract class MyItemBase
    {
        protected MyCollection<typeof(this)> _collection;
        public MyItem(MyCollection<typeof(this)> collection)
        {
            this._collection = collection;
        }

        public DoSomething()
        {
            this._collection.Call(this);
        }
    }

    public class MyItem : MyItemBase
    {
    }

Obviously, you can't declare MyCollection<typeof(this)> but I think by writing it this way you get the general idea of what I'm trying to do. Essentially, I want the abstract class' reference to the collection to mean MyCollection<MyClass>.

Is there any way to make this work?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all why is your ItemBase class containing an ItemCollection? Should it not be vice-versa, where your Collection class should contain Items?

However for your problem context, you can be type safe if you design your class this way :

 public class MyCollection<T> where T : MyItemBase<T>
{
    public void Call(MyItemBase<T> item) { }
}

public abstract class MyItemBase<T> where T : MyItemBase<T>
{
    protected MyCollection<T> _collection;

    protected MyItemBase(MyCollection<T> collection)
    {
        _collection = collection;
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        _collection.Call(this);
    }
}

public class MyItem : MyItemBase<MyItem>
{
    public MyItem(MyCollection<MyItem> Collection)
        : base(Collection)
    {
    }
}
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I edited it to the correct code, now. –  Zasz Aug 1 '11 at 9:35
    
Passing the collection to the Item seems weird because you might put the item in another list, and then the backreference is now invalid. –  Zasz Aug 1 '11 at 9:35
    
That was why I was using generics, so that the backreference would follow the same contract. I'm using the MVVM pattern and the collection has several properties that are populated once then used by all of child view-models. So it seemed right to pass the reference to the collection into each view-model's constructor so that it would have access to the larger scope. Maybe I should have separated the common properties from the collection and passed them to the view-model as separate references? –  Opus4210 Aug 22 '11 at 18:53
    
I do not know your setup, maybe you are justified in designing this way, but here are my thoughts for what its worth : Passing in the parent list to the child, and having the child call a method on the parent passing in itself as the argument like this._collection.Call(this); has scope for improvement in most scenarios. It usually becomes like this : Instead of this.parentcollection.call(this) it simply becomes base.call() or just call() where a base class (MyItemBase) does what the list does. –  Zasz Aug 23 '11 at 5:10
    
Disclaimer: I have only what you put in the question to work with, so take my suggestion with a pinch of salt, it may not work for you. –  Zasz Aug 23 '11 at 5:12

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