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I use ScheduledExecutorService to execute a method periodically.

p-code:

ScheduledExecutorService scheduler = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
ScheduledFuture<?> handle =
        scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(new Runnable() {
             public void run() { 
                 //Do business logic, may Exception occurs
             }
        }, 1, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

My question:

How to continue the scheduler, if run() throws Exception? Should I try-catch all Exception in method run()? Or any built-in callback method to handle the Exception? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You should use the ScheduledFuture object returned by your scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(...) like so :

ScheduledExecutorService scheduler = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
ScheduledFuture<?> handle =
        scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(new Runnable() {
             public void run() { 
                 throw new RuntimeException("foo");
             }
        }, 1, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

// Create and Start an exception handler thread
// pass the "handle" object to the thread
// Inside the handler thread do :
....
try {
  handle.get();
} catch (ExecutionException e) {
  Exception rootException = e.getCause();
}
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2  
I found the similar explanation here very helpful: cosmocode.de/en/blog/schoenborn/2009-12/… –  gencoreoperative Nov 13 '13 at 11:20

The Problem

The question refers to the critical trick with a ScheduledExecutorService: Any thrown exception or error reaching the executor causes the executor to halt. No more invocations on the Runnable, no more work done. This work stoppage happens silently, you'll not be informed. This naughty-language blog posting entertainingly narrates the hard way to learn about this behavior.

The Solution

The answer by yegor256 and the answer by arun_suresh both seem to be basically correct. Two issues with those answers:

  • Catch errors as well as exceptions
  • A bit complicated

Errors and Exceptions

In Java we normally catch only exceptions, not errors. But in this special case of ScheduledExecutorService, failing to catch either will mean a work stoppage. So you may want to catch both. I'm not 100% sure about this, not knowing fully the implications of catching all errors. Please correct me if needed.

One way to catch both exceptions and errors is to catch their superclass, Throwable.

} catch ( Throwable t ) {

…rather than…

} catch ( Exception e ) {

Simplest Approach: Just Add a Try-Catch

But both answers are a bit complicated. Just for the record, I'll show the simplest solution:

Always wrap your Runnable's code in a Try-Catch to catch any and all exceptions and errors.

With a lambda (in Java 8 and later).

final Runnable someChoreRunnable = () -> {
    try {
        doChore();
    } catch ( Throwable t ) {  // Catch Throwable rather than Exception (a subclass).
        logger.error( "Caught exception in ScheduledExecutorService. StackTrace:\n" + t.getStackTrace() );
    }
};

The old-fashioned way, before lambdas.

final Runnable someChoreRunnable = new Runnable()
{
    @Override
    public void run ()
    {
        try {
            doChore();
        } catch ( Throwable t ) {  // Catch Throwable rather than Exception (a subclass).
            logger.error( "Caught exception in ScheduledExecutorService. StackTrace:\n" + t.getStackTrace() );
        }
    }
};
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Another solution would be to swallow an exception in the Runnable. You can use a convenient VerboseRunnable class from jcabi-log, for example:

import com.jcabi.log.VerboseRunnable;
scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(
  new VerboseRunnable(
    Runnable() {
      public void run() { 
        // do business logic, may Exception occurs
      }
    },
    true // it means that all exceptions will be swallowed and logged
  ),
  1, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS
);
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