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I use ScheduledExecutorService to execute a method periodically.

p-code:

ScheduledExecutorService scheduler = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
ScheduledFuture<?> handle =
        scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(new Runnable() {
             public void run() { 
                 //Do business logic, may Exception occurs
             }
        }, 1, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

My question:

How to continue the scheduler, if run() throws Exception? Should I try-catch all Exception in method run()? Or any built-in callback method to handle the Exception? Thanks!

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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You should use the ScheduledFuture object returned by your scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(...) like so :

ScheduledExecutorService scheduler = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
ScheduledFuture<?> handle =
        scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(new Runnable() {
             public void run() { 
                 throw new RuntimeException("foo");
             }
        }, 1, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

// Create and Start an exception handler thread
// pass the "handle" object to the thread
// Inside the handler thread do :
....
try {
  handle.get();
} catch (ExecutionException e) {
  Exception rootException = e.getCause();
}
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1  
I found the similar explanation here very helpful: cosmocode.de/en/blog/schoenborn/2009-12/… –  gencoreoperative Nov 13 '13 at 11:20
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Another solution would be to swallow an exception in the Runnable. You can use a convenient VerboseRunnable class from jcabi-log, for example:

import com.jcabi.log.VerboseRunnable;
scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(
  new VerboseRunnable(
    Runnable() {
      public void run() { 
        // do business logic, may Exception occurs
      }
    },
    true // it means that all exceptions will be swallowed and logged
  ),
  1, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS
);
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