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for example

str = 'f01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
bin = str.to_i(16).to_s(2).rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)), '0')

so the size of the binary string is always the multiply of 64.
The problem here is, the str.length is the length before it's converted into binary. I need the length of the string after to_s(2). How do I access the return value of the to_s(2)?

Update I wonder if there is a one chain solution.

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You may take the two-line solution and write the two lines in one, separated by a ; It's a one-liner, but not one chain. –  knut Aug 1 '11 at 6:46
    
@knut haha.. then I should mean one chain then :) –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 6:47
    
Short remark: there is a typo in the 2nd length (it is lenght) –  knut Aug 1 '11 at 6:49
    
@knut, thanks for the remark –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 6:51
    
There's probably a term describing what you're trying to do. I wish I knew what it was so I could google it. –  Andrew Grimm Aug 1 '11 at 23:38
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The one-line solution would use Kernel#tap and str.replace:

ruby > str = 'f01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
 => "f01288c2" 
ruby > bin = str.to_i(16).to_s(2).rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)), '0')
 => "0000000000000000000000000000000011110000000100101000100011000010" 
ruby > bin = str.to_i(16).to_s(2).tap { |str| str.replace str.rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)), '0') }
 => "11110000000100101000100011000010" 
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yeah... that's cool! thanks –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 6:55
1  
But this loses the result of the latest calculation. So basically there is no point in doing it. –  Yossi Aug 1 '11 at 6:58
    
@Yossi: oops. Looks like knut got it right. I've... misunderstood everything a bit. –  whitequark Aug 1 '11 at 7:01
    
@Yossi can use replace inside the block {|str| str.replace str.rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)), '0') } –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 7:04
    
Okay, fixed it to be useful for anyone who'll encounter this question. –  whitequark Aug 1 '11 at 7:05
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You must split it to two lines:

str = 'f01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
len = str.to_i(16).to_s(2)
bin = len.rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.lenght % 64)), '0')
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there is no way to make it into one line? –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 6:43
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Do you need the value itself, or do you need it for length-calculation of the resulting bin?

Perhaps this solves you problem (but not your answer):

str = 'f01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
bin = "%0*b" % [str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)),str.to_i(16)]

Based on my other 'answer' and some thoughts I made a unit-test for the problem and combined the answers. I found no correct one-liner. in method my_solution I have at least some code, where my test says ok. I hope me test design was correct ;)

gem 'test-unit'
require 'test/unit'

def original(str) #from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6894901/how-to-access-return-value-of-a-method-chain-in-ruby
  str.to_i(16).to_s(2).rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)), '0')
end
def whitequark_1(str) #accepted: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6894901/how-to-access-return-value-of-a-method-chain-in-ruby/6894974#6894974
  str.to_i(16).to_s(2).tap { |str| str.replace str.rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)), '0') }
end  
def whitequark_2(str) #accepted: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6894901/how-to-access-return-value-of-a-method-chain-in-ruby/6894974#6894974
  str.to_i(16).to_s(2).rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)), '0')
end
def yossi(str)  #http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6894901/how-to-access-return-value-of-a-method-chain-in-ruby/6894943#6894943
  len = str.to_i(16).to_s(2)
  #~ len.rjust(str.length + (64 - (str.lenght % 64)), '0')
  len.rjust(str.size + (64 - (str.size% 64)), '0')
end
def my_solution(str)  #
  size1 = ("%0b" % str.to_i(16).to_s).size
  size2 = 64 * ( size1 / 64 + [1, size1 % 64 ].min)
  "%0*b" % [size2, str.to_i(16)]
end

#Select the version you want to check
#~ alias :experiment :original #wrong
#~ alias :experiment :yossi
#~ alias :experiment :whitequark_1 #wrong with f01288c2_f01288c2
#~ alias :experiment :whitequark_2  #wrong with f_f01288c2_f01288c2
alias :experiment :my_solution

#Testcases for different Test-setups.
module MyTestcases
  def test_binary()
    assert_match( /\A[01]+\Z/, @bin)
  end
  def test_solution()
    pend "No solution defined #{@bin}" unless defined? @solution
    assert_equal( 0, @solution.size % 64)
    assert_equal( @bin.to_i(2), @solution.to_i(2))
    assert_equal( @str, @solution.to_i(2).to_s(16))
    assert_equal( @solution, @bin)
  end
  def test_multiply64()
    assert_equal( 0, @bin.size % 64, 'no multiply of 64')
  end
  def test_smallest64()
    size = ("%b" % @str.to_i(16)).size
    smallestsize = 0
    #determine smallest 
    while smallestsize < size
      smallestsize += 64
    end
    assert_equal( smallestsize, @bin.size, 'not smallest multiply of 64')
  end
end

class MyTest_00000001 < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @str = '1' #a hexadecimal string
    @bin = experiment(@str)
    @solution = "0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001"
  end
  include MyTestcases
end
class MyTest_f01288c2 < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @str = 'f01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
    @bin = experiment(@str)
    @solution = "0000000000000000000000000000000011110000000100101000100011000010"
  end
  include MyTestcases
end
class MyTest_ff01288c2 < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @str = 'ff01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
    @bin = experiment(@str)
    @solution = "0000000000000000000000000000111111110000000100101000100011000010"
  end
  include MyTestcases
end
class MyTest_f01288c2_f01288c2 < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @str = 'f01288c2f01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
    @bin = experiment(@str)
    @solution = "1111000000010010100010001100001011110000000100101000100011000010"
  end
  include MyTestcases
end
class MyTest_f_f01288c2_f01288c2 < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @str = 'ff01288c2f01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
    @bin = experiment(@str)
    @solution = "00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111000000010010100010001100001011110000000100101000100011000010"
  end
  include MyTestcases
end
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this works too, and shorter. BTW, how to make the 0s to the right instead? –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 7:05
    
How do you mean the 0 to the right? Talking in a example with 4 characters instead 64: 3 (binary 11) should be a 1100. How do you see the difference to 17 (binary 1100)? My solution would make 0011. –  knut Aug 1 '11 at 13:31
    
No, both methods in this answer are wrong. Test 'em and you'll see. –  glenn mcdonald Aug 2 '11 at 2:20
    
@glenn You are right. I just had the idea of using sprintf, but never tested for correct output. I reworked my answer and added a unit-test. Hope I get it now. –  knut Aug 2 '11 at 19:44
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Maybe I'm missing something, but you can access the return value of to_s(2) very easily by doing this:

r = str.to_i(16).to_s(2)
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can I do it in one line? –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 6:41
    
Yes, see tokland's answer. –  David Grayson Aug 1 '11 at 20:07
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In real code you'd use an intermediate line to assign the lenght (see @Yossi's answer), it's the proper way to do it. Now, if you want a way to do a one-liner for fun, well, you can use for example the Object#as abstraction (which is in fact rather useful in some cases)

class Object
  def as
    yield self
  end
end

str = 'f01288c2'
len, bin = str.to_i(16).to_s(2).as { |len| [len, len.rjust(str.length + (64-(str.length%64)), '0') }
share|improve this answer
    
this looks just like the tap method –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 8:28
1  
@Phelios: no, tap returns the element being tapped, while Object#as returns the result of the block. "tap" promotes side-effects, while "as" does not. –  tokland Aug 1 '11 at 14:40
    
Is there a term for what you're doing? –  Andrew Grimm Aug 2 '11 at 7:56
1  
Hi @Andrew. You can see Object#as as an inverted binding (let). This kind of inversion in combinatory logic is called thrust. Take a look at this page, reganwald called it Object#into: github.com/raganwald/homoiconic/blob/master/2008-10-30/… –  tokland Aug 2 '11 at 8:24
    
@* Extra nerdy points: Does this map to a combinator (identity?) or can it be represented as a monad/arrow? –  Barry Feb 29 '12 at 6:34
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This is no 'answer', but a question - and it is a bit too long for a comment -soory.

so the size of the binary string is always the multiply of 64.

Your str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)) should be a multiple of 64, so the binary string fits in?

For '11f01288c2' (10 characters) it should be 128? right? (64 is to small, so you need 128) But your calculation returns 64.

Is there a misunderstanding from my side?

Here a code example (and a quick version of another calculation - perhaps theres a better one):

str = '11f01288c2' #a hexadecimal string
p (str.length + (64 - (str.length % 64)))  #-> 64
p 64 * ((str.length * 8).divmod(64).first + 1) #-> 128
p 64 * ((str.length).divmod(8).first + 1) #-> 128
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you are right, '11f01288c2' should become 128 digits in binary. My code above is incorrect and that's actually the question. –  Phelios Aug 1 '11 at 10:01
    
I updated my first answer. I thinks that's a solution. –  knut Aug 1 '11 at 18:11
    
Er, either you're both confused or I am. 11f01288c2 in hex is 77042190530 in decimal which is 1000111110000000100101000100011000010 in binary. Only 37 digits. Each hex digit turns into 4 binary digits, so a 10-digit hex number can only be 40 binary digits at most. –  glenn mcdonald Aug 2 '11 at 2:12
    
@glenn, you are right. So the better example will be a 20 digits Hex become 128 digits binary –  Phelios Aug 2 '11 at 3:16
    
You're trying to calculate the number of zeros you need for padding the binary string by using the length of the hex string. This can never work, because any given length of hex string can produce four different lengths of binary string. –  glenn mcdonald Aug 2 '11 at 12:32
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I think the calculation you want is:

(str.length / 64.0).ceil * 64

Yours will produce an unnecessary 64 0s on strings that are already an even multiple of 64 long.

The problem you're having is that you're trying to treat rjust like a block, so that you can get access to its receiver. But because it's a method, its arguments are evaluated before it is itself called. So the way to wedge this into a one-liner is to turn it around, creating an anonymous function and then calling it on your string:

lambda {|x| x.rjust((x.length / 64.0).ceil * 64, '0')}.call(str.to_i(16).to_s(2))

It's actually slightly puzzling to me that there's no built-in way to call a block on an object in Ruby, like tap but returning the result of the block. (Am I missing something?)

But of course we can easily create one ourselves:

class Object
  def doblock
    block_given? ? yield self : self
  end
end

and that would then let us do (among other things):

str.to_i(16).to_s(2).doblock {|x| x.rjust((x.length / 64.0).ceil * 64, '0')}
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