Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

the object F has a function stored as this.fn and this.state.fn. can be called successfully as f.fn() but not as f.state.fn()

function F( i, f ) {
        this.i = i;     
        this.state = { 'fn':f };
        this.f = f;
};                      
F.prototype.inc = function() { this.i++ };
F.prototype.fn = function() { this.state.fn() };
f1 = new F( 1, function() { console.log( this.i ); } );
f1.f();                 // this works
f1.inc();               // this works
f1.state.fn;            // prints the function
f1.fn();                // undefined!
f1.state.fn();          // undefined!

the problem seems to be that the function is stored in the object state, because this works:

f1.state.fn.call( f1 );
F.prototype.fn = function() { this.state.fn.call(this); };

which seems to imply that the this context within F.state.fn is not F but rather F.state - which to me is completely counter-intuitive - is this right!?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Within a function, this depends entirely on how you called the function.

When you call a function using dot notation from an object this will be automatically set to that object.

If you say someObject.someChildObject.someFunction() then within someFunction() you'll find this will be set to someChildObject.

So in your example f1.fn() should result in this being f1 within fn(), but then within that function you say this.state.fn() - which will call state's fn() with this set to state.

You can override this behaviour using call or apply.

Another example just for your interest:

function F( i, f ) {
        this.i = i;     
        this.state = { 'fn':f };
        this.f = f;
};                      
f1 = new F( 1, function() { console.log( this.i ); } );
f1.f();   // works - 'this' will be f1
var x = f1.f; // create a reference to the same function
x();      // won't work - 'this' will probably be 'window'

If you create a reference to a function originally defined as an object property and call the function via that reference then this will be whatever applies to your new reference. In my example the x reference is a global, which in practice means it belongs to the window object. What you can learn from this is that the function that f1.f() calls doesn't really belong to f1 at all.

Continuing that example:

f2 = {};
f2.i = "hello";
f2.f = f1.f;
f2.f(); // 'this' will be f2, so should log "hello"

When you call f2.f(), you'll find this is set to f2, and because I've set a property f2.i the function will log that property.

share|improve this answer
    
outstanding! thank you very much for your enlightenment and the work you put into your answer. –  cc young Aug 1 '11 at 7:28
add comment

Live example

function F(i, f) {
    this.i = i;
    this.state = {
        'fn': f,
        i: 42
    };
    this.f = f;
};
F.prototype.inc = function() {
    this.i++
};
F.prototype.fn = function() {
    this.state.fn()
};
f1 = new F(1, function() {
    console.log(this.i);
});
f1.f(); // this works
f1.inc(); // this works
f1.state.fn; // prints the function
f1.fn(); // 42!
f1.state.fn(); // 42!

When you call state.fn() it prints this.i which is state.i which is 42 in my case but undefined in your case.

You can alternatively force this to not be state but to be the object you expect it to be by doing

this.state = {
    'fn': f.bind(this)
};

.bind is ES5 however so you should get the ES5-shim

share|improve this answer
    
absolutely - nice test! but it still comes back to the fact that this is not associated with F but rather F.state - this (as it were) is what took me by suprise! –  cc young Aug 1 '11 at 6:48
    
missed bind on first read - very cool. seems to work fine on chrome and ff. –  cc young Aug 1 '11 at 6:56
    
@cc_young bind fails on older browsers. Mainly FF3.6 and IE8. MDN has a shim –  Raynos Aug 1 '11 at 6:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.