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I've got two tables in my SQL Server 2008 database, Users and Items

tblUser 
--------------------------
UserID    uniqueidentifier
Name      nvarchar(50)
etc..


tblItem 
--------------------------
ItemID    uniqueidentifier
ItemName      nvarchar(50)
etc..

tlmUserUserItem
----------------------------
ItemID      uniqueidentifier
UserID_A    uniqueidentifier
UserID_B    uniqueidentifier

I want to join these together in a many to many join table that will get huge (potentially more than a billion rows as the application logic requires stats over shared user --> item joins)

The join table needs to be indexed on the UserID_A and UserID_B columns since the lookups are based on a user against their peers.

My question is this:

Is it worth adding an auto increment INT on the user table to use as a non primary key then use that in the join table? So the User table looks like:

tblUser 
---------------------------------
UserID         uniqueidentifier
Name           nvarchar(50)
UserIDJoinKey  int  identity(1,1)
etc..

Doing that, will it be faster to do something like:

declare @ID int
select * from tblJoin where UserIDJoinKey_A = @ID or UserIDJoinKey_B = @ID

when the join table looks like this:

tlmUserUserItem
-----------------------------------
ItemID             uniqueidentifier
UserIDJoinKey_A    int
UserIDJoinKey_B    int

rather than this:

tlmUserUserItem
----------------------------
ItemID      uniqueidentifier
UserID_A    uniqueidentifier
UserID_B    uniqueidentifier

Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers 4

If you're having a performance problem on join operations to the table with the uniqueidentifier, first check the index fragmentation. Hot tables with a uniqueidentifier clustered index tend to get fragmented quickly. There's good info on how to do that at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189858.aspx

If you are able to move the clustered index to the new int column and rewrite your queries to use the new int column instead of the old uniqueidentifier, you're biggest benefit is going to be that you'll reduce rate of fragmentation. This helps avoid having your queries slow down after a a bunch of writes to the table.

In most cases, you will not notice a huge difference in the time to process join operations on a uniqueidentifier column versus an int in MSSQL 2008 -- assuming all other things (including fragmentation) are equal.

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I may be misunderstanding something along the line, but you're looking to add an identity AND a uniqueidentifier to a each record? When I see you using a GUID, I assume there is either offline functionality that will be merged when the user goes online, or there is some extraneous reason that the GUID was chosen. That reason should hinder you from being able to correctly implement an identity column on each item.

If there is no specific reason why you needed to use a guid over an identity, I'd say scrap the GUID all together. It's bloating your tables, indexes, and slowing down your joins. If I'm misunderstanding please let me know and I apologize!

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To find out what is the best solution there is first some indexing theory. SQL Server stores it's clustered index data in a B+ Tree of data pages which allow for about 8K data per page. When you know that a uniqueidentifier is 16 bytes per key and an int is 4 bytes per key this means there will be 4 times more keys per index page with an int.

To have a faster join with the int column you will most likely have to make it the clustered index. Be aware that having an additional index on such a large table might create an unwanted performance hit on insert statements as there is a more information to write to disk.

It all boils down to benchmark both solutions and choosing the one which performs best for you. If the table is more read heavy, the int column will offer overall better performance.

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@MikeM,

Personally I would always choose a uniqueidentifier over an int as the primary key of a table every time. I would however use NEWSEQUENTIALID() and not NEWGUID() to ensure there is less index fragmentation.

The reason I make this choice is simple:

Integers are too easy to get mixed up, and on a table which has several foreign keys, the chances of "accidentally" putting a value in the wrong field is too high. You will never see the problem because ALL identity columns start at a seed of 1 and so most tables tend to have matching integer values in each table. By using uniqueidentifier I absolutely guarantee for all instances of a column that has a foreign key that the value I place in it is correct, because the table it references is the only table capable of having that unique identifier.

What's more... in code, your arguments would all be int, which again opens you up to the possibility of accidentally putting the wrong value in the wrong parameter and you would never know any different. By using unique identifiers instead, once again you are guaranteeing the correct reference.

Trying to track down bugs due to cross posted integers is insidious and the worst part is that you never know the problem has occurred until it is too late and data has become far too corrupted for you to ever unjumble. All it takes is one cross matched integer field and you could potentially create millions of inconsistent rows, none of which you would be aware of until you just "happen" to try and insert a value that doesn't exist in the referenced table... and by then it could be too late.

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