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I want to test a delete methode. The delete methode is called in a mocked service (not mocked with moq).

The service manages a list of objects. The class of the objects is derived from a base class overriding equals().

 public override bool Equals(object obj) {
        if (obj == null || GetType() != obj.GetType()) {
            return false;
        }

        BaseClass testObj = (BaseClass)obj;
        return BusinessId.Equals(testObj.BusinessId);

    }

When I call

 serive.GetAll().Contains(objectInList);

I get false.

The Equals method in the base class is not called. The objects in the list are mocked with moq.

 Mock<TypeOfObject> objectMock = new Mock<TypeOfObject>();
 objectMock.SetupGet(pf => pf.BusinessId).Returns(guid);
 return objectMock.Object;

How do I have to setup the mock that the Equals-Methode of the base class is called and the Contains-method returns true?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
wouldnt this work? objectMock .Setup(a => a.Equals("something")).Returns(true); –  Illuminati Aug 1 '11 at 9:33
    
but then i always get true for equals and for contains? –  Tobias Aug 1 '11 at 9:37
    
@Tobias, don't forget to override GetHashCode along with Equals! It probably won't solve this very issue, but it might prevent more problems further down the road. –  stakx Aug 1 '11 at 11:10
    
I do override GetHashCode. –  Tobias Aug 1 '11 at 11:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can make the mock to call your Equals method by settings Mock.CallBase property to true, e.g.:


Mock<TypeOfObject> objectMock = new Mock<TypeOfObject>();
objectMock.SetupGet(pf => pf.BusinessId).Returns(guid);
objectMock.CallBase = true;
return objectMock.Object;

share|improve this answer

It's failing because of your GetType() check. The object you're passing is a Mock, not BaseClass.

Try this:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    if (obj != null && obj is BaseClass)
    {
        return BusinessId.Equals((obj as BaseClass).BusinessId);
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I see this a lot, when you do an is check, why not just use the faster (BaseClass)obj, as can be thought of internally as doing the following: obj is T? (T)obj : default(T). Thus it seems pointless to use an as inside of an is. –  Lukazoid Mar 6 '12 at 12:54
    
The explicit cast (BaseClass)obj throws an exception if the cast is not valid, whereas is and as don't. But you can usually avoid doing both is+cast simply by doing (only) an as and checking for a null return. –  Royston Shufflebotham Apr 3 '13 at 14:28

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