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I want to profile & optimize my PHP scripts regarding file i/o. So at first it is necessary to count how much i/o happens within a script and all of its includes. How do I do that, without modifying the scripts? Is there any possibility to somehow overload file-related functions and add counting to them? Or an extension at least?

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Use vmstat and iostat to find whether you are cpu, mem or i/o bound. Use XDebug to profile your PHP application. –  Gordon Aug 1 '11 at 10:12
    
Isn't XDebug all about CPU? I don't remember any i/o-related settings or output... –  Ilya Vassilevsky Aug 1 '11 at 12:15
    
No, it isnt. It's an application profiler and debug tool and it can collect native function calls. Apart from that, you can also look at strace though thats pretty low level. –  Gordon Aug 1 '11 at 12:37

3 Answers 3

I think the best thing you'll get is finding out how many (and which) files have been included (which also is some kind of file I/O).

http://php.net/manual/en/function.get-included-files.php

I don't think there's a built-in "how much file I/O did fread/fwrite do" function that would allow you to figure all that out without modifying your scripts or server.

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Thanks, I know about that function. Yes, it's handy. But I wanted to count all of file_exists, fstat, filemtime, fread, fwrite, file_get/put_contents, etc. –  Ilya Vassilevsky Aug 1 '11 at 12:17

Use vmstat and iostat to find whether you are cpu, mem or i/o bound. You can also use strace to log system calls. Use XDebug or xhprof to profile your PHP application.

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Hmmm I wonder how can I run PHP inside strace inside Apache in response to HTTP requests... –  Ilya Vassilevsky Aug 1 '11 at 14:21

So at first it is necessary to count how much i/o happens within a script and all of its includes.

It is not necessary to count how much I/O happens within a script and its includes.

It is only necessary to pause it at random several times and each time examine the call stack. If one I/O takes twice as much time as another, you're twice as likely to see it on each pause. It doesn't matter if it's in your script or in an include. Anything that takes enough time to be worth optimizing will appear more than once.

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