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When entered directory into the command line, this:

ls -d -1 "/Volumes/Development/My Project/Project"/**/* | grep \.png$

Prints a list of all the file ending in .png.

However when I try and create a script:

#! /bin/bash

clear ;

# Tempoary dir for processing
mkdir /tmp/ScriptOutput/ ;

wdir="/Volumes/Development/My Project/Project" ;

echo "Working Dir: $wdir" ;

# Get every .PNG file in the project
for image in `ls -d -1 "$wdir"/**/* | grep \.png$`; do
...    
done

I get the error:

cp: /Volumes/Development/My: No such file or directory

The space is causing an issue, but I don't know why?

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4 Answers 4

Another option is to change IFS:

OLDIFS="$IFS"  # save it
IFS="" # don't split on any white space
for file in `ls -R . | grep png`
do 
    echo "$file"
done
IFS=$OLDIFS # restore IFS

Read more about IFS in man bash.

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Use more quotes and don't parse ls output.

for image in "$wdir"/**/*.png; do
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If you fine with using while read and subprocess created by pipe, you can:

find . -name '*.png' | while read FILE
do 
    echo "the File is [$FILE]"
done
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You could even 'find . -name '*.png' -exec echo {} \;'. The -exec option to find can be used many times if needed. –  jfgagne Aug 1 '11 at 16:07
    
Right - for one command (like echo here) it's best to use -exec (or |xargs for better performance if there are many files). For more than one command I prefer to while loop. It's easier to read for me. Cheers. –  Michał Šrajer Aug 1 '11 at 18:37

you can try, [[:space:]] in place of space

wdir="/Volumes/Development/My[[:space:]]Project/Project"

or execute command to convert single space

wdir=`echo "$wdir" | sed 's/[[:space:]]/\[[:space:]]/g'`
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