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Given data similar to:

var data = [{id: 12345, 
    name:'my products', 
    items:[{ 
               size: 'XXL', 
               sku: 'awe2345', 
               prices:[{type: 'rrp',prices: 10.99}, 
                        {type: 'sell_price', price: 9.99}, 
                         {type:'dealer', price:4.50} 
               ] 
               },{ 
               size: 'XL', 
               sku: 'awe2346', 
               prices:[{type: 'rep', prices: 10.99}, 
                          {type: 'sell_price', price: 9.99}, 
                          {type:'dealer', price:4.50} 
               ] 
               } 
       ] 
   }] 
}]

is there a way to evaluate a string representation of an element in the data object? for example: "data[0].items[0].prices[0].rrp" ...without using eval()?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The ideal solution would be to not have the string representation in the first place. Seriously ask yourself whether you change the existing code to give you the content in a more ideal output.

However, if you can't, this should do what you want:

var path = "data[0].items[0].prices[0].rrp".split(/[\[\]\.]+/);
var next = window;

if (path[path.length - 1] == "") {
    path.pop();
};

while (path.length && (next = next[path.shift()]) && typeof next == "object" && next !== null);

next;

Create a function for this:

function get(path) {
    var next = window;

    path = path.split(/[\[\]\.]+/);

    if (path[path.length - 1] == "") {
        path.pop();
    };

    while (path.length && (next = next[path.shift()]) && typeof next === "object" && next !== null);

    return path.length ? undefined : next;
}

Downsides:

  1. The variable data must be in the global scope for this to work (cannot be a local variable).

  2. It's skanky. Use it as a last resort.

Edit: To use setting functionality, you can abuse the pass-by-reference nature of JavaScript objects as follows:

function set(path, value) {
    var split = Math.max(path.lastIndexOf("["), path.lastIndexOf("."));

    get(path.slice(0, split))[path.slice(split + 1).replace(/\]/, "")] = value;
}

To provide some explanation of how this works:

The getter first splits the input into an array, so that each element is a member we need to traverse [data, 0, items, 0, prices, 0, rrp]. If the search string ends with a "]", we get an extra empty-element at the end of the array, so we check for that and remove it.

We then do the big loop; so whist we have elements to traverse (while path.length), set the next variable to the next object member we need to traverse next = next[path.shift()]. Check that it's an object (otherwise it wont have any members to traverse), and check that it isn't null (because typeof null == "object").

Once the loop has executed, we'll have the final element in the chain; so return it.

The setter searches for the last object reference in the search string, and retrieves that object reference using the get() function. It then sets the returned objects key to the desired value. If we hadn't done it this way, we'd have been setting a value rather than a reference, so the "real" object would never get updated.

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that is brilliant –  Vaibhav Garg Aug 1 '11 at 13:16
    
Agreed - a brilliant suggestion which works. ...although I'm still struggling to get my head around exactly how it works! However, ideally I needed a reference to the specified element of the object to allow for setting as well as getting - can you suggest how that could be done? –  Alistair Aug 1 '11 at 14:01
    
@Alistair: I've added code for setting values, and tried to provide some explanation of how it works. –  Matt Aug 1 '11 at 15:07
    
Fantastic - thanks –  Alistair Aug 1 '11 at 15:29
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I'm not sure if I understand that question, but I guess you want to "select" that object within the inner Array ?

If thats the case, you need to loop over that inner Array.

Object.keys( data[0].items[0].prices[0] ).some(function( obj ) {
    if( obj.type === 'rrp' ) {
        // do something with that object here
        return true;
    }
});

To have that code ES3 compliant, we would go for:

var target = data[0].items[0].prices[0],
    len    = target.length;

for(var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if( target[i].type === 'rrp' ) {
        // do something with target[i]
        break;
    } 
}

If I got the question wrong, doh sorry for your time :-)

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1  
Thanks but I'm looking for a generic way of achieving this. e.g. given a string "data[0].items[0].prices[0].rrp" and returning 10.99 or a string of "data[0].items[1]" and returning the object. –  Alistair Aug 1 '11 at 12:29
    
@AlistairFleming: got it. However, even with eval it would not work to call/execute that string you mentioned. You need a loop and compare values. –  jAndy Aug 1 '11 at 12:35
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If you use a getter instead of an exposed public field, you can make your way there doing some post-processing before the first return of your collection:

   var data = [{
        id: 12345,
        name: 'my products',
        items: [{
            size: 'XXL',
            sku: 'awe2345',
            prices: [{ type: 'rrp', price: 10.99 },
                    { type: 'sell_price', price: 9.99 },
                    { type: 'dealer', price: 4.50 }
                   ]
        }, {
            size: 'XL',
            sku: 'awe2346',
            prices: [{ type: 'rep', price: 10.99 },
                            { type: 'sell_price', price: 9.99 },
                            { type: 'dealer', price: 4.50}]
        }
            ],
        getItems: function () {
            if (!this._applied) {
                this._applied = true;
                for (var i = 0; i <  this.items.length; i++) {
                    this.items[i].prices = this._asCrossReferencable(this.items[i].prices);
                }
            }
            return this.items;
        },
        _asCrossReferencable: function (priceArr) {
            for (var i = 0; i < priceArr.length; i++) {
                priceArr[i][priceArr[i].type] = priceArr[i].price;
            }
            return priceArr;
        },
        _applied: false
    }];

    var items = data[0].getItems();
    for(var i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
        for(var p = 0; p < items[i].prices.length; p++){
            var price = items[i].prices[p];
            alert(price[price.type]);
        }
    }

That's a lot of bloat though just for some lazy shorthand.

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Matt's solution is pure genius - however there is some room for improvement:

  • The solution fails if the 'path' has no separators; set('h1', somevalue) will fail because the splitting of the path fails in that case
  • Only global scope is supported.
  • If you have an object with obj.here.is.a.value = "I am a value" and you ask for obj.here.is.a.value.no.value - it will still return "I am a value"

Here's my fix for these three issues:

    getPropertyValueByPath : function(obj, path)
    {
        path = path.split(/[\[\]\.]+/);

        if(path[path.length - 1] == "")
        {
            path.pop();
        };

        while(path.length && ( obj = obj[path.shift()]));

        return obj;
    }


setPropertyValuebyPath : function(obj, path, value)
    {
        var pathElements = path.replace(/\[|\]/g, '.').replace(/\.+/g, '.').split(/\./)
        pathEnd = pathElements[pathElements.length - 1]
        pathRoot = (pathElements.slice(0, pathElements.length - 1).join('.'))

        var currObj = obj

        for(var i = 0; i < pathElements.length; i++)
        {

            if( typeof (currObj[pathElements[i]]) == 'undefined')
            {
                currObj[pathElements[i]] = {}
            }
            currObj = currObj[pathElements[i]]
        }
        // This line by Matt is genious :)
        getPropertyValueByPath(obj, pathRoot)[pathEnd] = value
        return true
    }

call them like this:

var joe = {}

setPropertyValueByPath(joe,'the[1].long.and[2].road', 'yeah')

// joe.the[1].long.and[2].road now has a value of 'yeah' - 
// all the missing objects were created

// this will alert 'yeah'
alert( getPropertyValueByPath(joe,'the[1].long.and[2].road') )
share|improve this answer
    
ABSOLUTE gold. as a working fiddle jsfiddle.net/UQTBK/1 thanks all. –  Steve Black Jul 30 '13 at 10:43
    
Extended this to support arrays betterly jsfiddle.net/UQTBK/4 –  Steve Black Jul 30 '13 at 12:16
    
and end node array handling jsfiddle.net/UQTBK/5 so you can have (joe, 'the[1].long.and[2].road[3]', 'yeah') –  Steve Black Jul 31 '13 at 12:45
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