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MyClass is a singleton class (There will only ever be one of these in my whole program).

What I want to do is follows.

  1. Add data to my class using AddData, get a function pointer returned that I can then pass to 'another' function in a dll.
  2. Then this 'other' function calls my call back function

My class is like so.

typedef void (*DataReceivedCallback)(int, int);  

class MyClass
{
    MyClass();
    ~MyClass();

    void AddData(int sourceId, DataReceivedCallback &callback);
    static void MyCallBackFunction(int var1, int var2);
};

void MyClass::AddData(int sourceId, DataReceivedCallback &callback)
{
    callback = &MyCallBackFunction;

}
void MyClass::MyCallBackFunction(int var1, int var2 )
{
    //do something blah blah
}

I can then do:

int main()
{
     DataReceivedCallback callback;
     MyClass->GetInstance()->AddData(1, callback);
     callback(1,100);
}

When I step through this I see that I do actually step into the callback MyCallBackFunction which is what I want :)

What I then want to do now is pass this 'callback' defined in main to a dll function that will call back into my callback function.

I have the code for the dll so I want to modify one if its functions so that it accepts my callback function parameter.

I am doing this in the dll function signature:

void * someDllFunction( int var1, int var2, DataReceivedCallback& callback)
{
   callback(2, 200);
}

But I get the error: error C2872: 'DataReceivedCallback' : ambiguous symbol

How can I solve this? Does this have to do with only being allowed to use c-style parameters across dll boundaries??

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand your entire setup: You say that you only want one instance of your singleton class MyClass, yet you have this overly elaborate scheme to return a pointer to its member function. Why? If there's just one such instance and one such class, why this indirection? Why is there a function AddData -- it's not adding anything! –  Kerrek SB Aug 1 '11 at 12:33

3 Answers 3

typedef void (*DataReceivedCallback)(int, int);

should be,

typedef void (MyClass::*DataReceivedCallback)(int, int);

Because, MyCallBackFunction is a non-static member method of MyClass. So it cannot have regular function signature. Also change assignment to,

callback = &MyClass::MyCallBackFunction;

Demo.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, it should be an std::function(or boost::function), if you ask me :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Aug 1 '11 at 12:31
    
sorry my function is static, I pasted the cdoe wrong. –  harry Aug 1 '11 at 13:53
    
@harry, at which line you are getting error. I see your code fine otherwise: ideone.com/w1szD. What's GetInstance() ? –  iammilind Aug 1 '11 at 13:54

You got your types wrong. DataReceivedCallback, alias void(*)(int, int), is a function pointer, but &MyClass::MyCallBackFunction is a pointer-to-member-function (PTMF). Those two are entirely unrelated and incompatible types!

You cannot treat a member function as a free function.

Since you only have one single instance of your class (Note: "one instance", not "one class"; you always only have one class), why bother with member functions at all? Just make the function global (inside a namespace) and you're done. Though perhaps I'm misunderstanding your requirements.

Another note: You don't need to pass function pointers by reference to the DLL function, just pass them by value. They're just pointers, so they're light-weight.

share|improve this answer
    
He does need to pass his function pointer by reference because he is trying to assign to them in the function body and, presumably, he wants that assignment visible once the function has returned. (He could of course return it by value, perhaps you meant this as well?) –  Charles Bailey Aug 1 '11 at 12:34
    
@Charles: Updated, I meant the call of the DLL function. I' assuming that the DLL would be participating in this scheme and just calls the function. –  Kerrek SB Aug 1 '11 at 12:36

The thing you are missing is how to declare a pointer to member function and how to invoke the member function via that pointer, below is a working example based on your example:

class MyClass;
//standard way to declare a pointer to member function should be - className::*memberFunName(para list)
typedef void (MyClass::*DataReceivedCallback)(int, int);  

class MyClass
{
public:
    void AddData(int sourceId, DataReceivedCallback &callback);
    void MyCallBackFunction(int var1, int var2);
};


void MyClass::AddData(int sourceId, DataReceivedCallback &callback)
{
    callback = &MyClass::MyCallBackFunction;

}
void MyClass::MyCallBackFunction(int var1, int var2 )
{
    //do something blah blah
    int tem = var1 + var2; //tem = 3 here
}

int main()
{
    MyClass obj;
    DataReceivedCallback callback;
    obj.AddData(1, callback);
    (obj.*callback)(1,2); //standard way to call the member function via function pointer
}
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