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In the following code:

public class SomeClass
{
    // ... constructor and other stuff

    public in SomeProperty
    {
        get
        {
            return SomeHeayCalculation();
        }
    } 
}

I consider the class to be immutable, so every time SomeProperty is accessed, same value should be returned. My question is whether it is possible to avoid calculating the value each time. Is there some built in mechanism for caching such stuff?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Yup - Lazy<T>, assuming you're using .NET 4:

public class SomeClass
{
    private readonly Lazy<Foo> foo = new Lazy<Foo>(SomeHeayCalculation);
    // ... constructor and other stuff

    public Foo SomeProperty
    {
        get
        {
            return foo.Value;
        }
    } 
}

I assume you're trying to avoid performing the calculation if the property is never accessed. Otherwise, just perform it upfront on construction.

Note that properties are often understood to be "cheap" to evaluate - and while you're making this lazy so that later accesses are cheap, this is still potentially going to be "heavy" enough on the first access to make a property inappropriate. Consider a ComputeXyz method instead.

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I think he means every time he calls .SomeProperty, to retrieve the cached version, so the calculation does not have to be done every time. –  user195488 Aug 1 '11 at 13:12
1  
@0A0D: Yes, that's what Lazy<T> will do. It will execute SomeHeavyCalculation once (when Value is first accessed) and then return the cached version thereafter. –  Jon Skeet Aug 1 '11 at 13:13
    
Oh ok, I did not understand that from the link you provided. Thanks for the clarification. –  user195488 Aug 1 '11 at 13:14
    
+1 amazing, didn't listen of this... –  Tigran Aug 1 '11 at 13:26
    
It looks cleaner than the idea to save the result as a private flag and variable in the class, but still it is not perfect. I was expecting something like an annotation you can put on a method you want to cache. –  Artium Aug 1 '11 at 13:33

Just cache the calculation in a private variable like so:

public class SomeClass
{        
    // ... constructor and other stuff

    private int? calculation = null;

    public int SomeProperty
    {
        get
        {
            if (!calculation.HasValue)
                calculation = SomeHeayCalculation();

            return calculation.Value;
        }
    } 
}
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Other than what Jon suggested, you could use this pattern:

public class SomeClass
{
    // ... constructor and other stuff
    private Foo _foo;

    public Foo SomeProperty
    {
        get
        {
            return _foo ?? (_foo = SomeHeayCalculation());
        }
    } 
}

It's worth noting that this really breaks down (read: becomes less readable) for value types, unless you want to wrap them in Nullable<T>. In that's your case, you may want to stick with Lazy<T> if available.

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3  
It also breaks if null is a valid value. –  Ray Aug 1 '11 at 13:17
    
@Ray: excellent point. –  Marc Aug 1 '11 at 13:19

Just keep a flag to remember if the calculation have been done.

public class SomeClass
{
    // ... constructor and other stuff

   private bool _propertyCalculated;
   private int _someProperty;

    public int SomeProperty
    {
        get
        {
            if (!_propertyCaculated)
            {
                _someProperty = SomeHeayCalculation();
                _propertyCaculated = true;
            }
            return _someProperty;
        }
    } 
}
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