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How to match for the word dog and cat in the following lines.

The dog

The cat

The word at the beginning of the line("The") remains same. The words "dog" and "cat" changes and this is the word to be matched.

The regular expression should match for the word after the word "The" but not "The".

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Can you clarify your question: Will it always match only "dog" or "cat"? Will the preceding word always be "The"? In other words, can you generalize your question? –  kevlar1818 Aug 1 '11 at 13:23
    
You should clarify whether you're talking about regexp searching interactively, e.g. with M-x replace-regexp or programmatically. If the latter, Michael Markert's answer will help you. –  sanityinc Aug 1 '11 at 13:41
    
Regular expression is used in program, not interactively. –  Talespin_Kit Aug 1 '11 at 20:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This should do you want:

The \(\w+\)

The word after The is then the \1 Group.

In elisp that's

(replace-regexp "\\(\\w+\\)" "\\1")
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Just to add a little info, in the program it should be used as "\(\\w+\)" and "\\1". –  Talespin_Kit Aug 1 '11 at 20:55
    
That's not right: In a string it has to be "The \\(\\w+\\)" and "\\1". Just "\(" would be evaluated to "(". –  Michael Markert Aug 1 '11 at 21:11
    
On second thought: You were probably bitten by escaping, I added it to the answer. –  Michael Markert Aug 1 '11 at 21:14

Emacs regexps do not feature zero-width assertions, so you cannot avoid matching that preceding text, if it is critical to the pattern.

You can, of course, use grouping to isolate the parts of the matched string that you are interested in (as per Michael Markert's answer).

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+1 for sharing information on zero-width assertion –  Talespin_Kit Aug 1 '11 at 20:51

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