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I have the following dictionary:

history = {
"2008-11-17": 41, 
"2010-05-28": 82, 
"2008-11-14": 47, 
"2008-11-13": 60, 
"2008-11-12": 56, 
"2008-11-11": 55, 
"2008-11-10": 98, 
"2008-11-19": 94, 
"2008-11-18": 94, 
"2004-05-27": 82, 
"2004-05-26": 45, 
"2004-05-25": 70,
# there's more ...
}

How do I define a generator function get_records(dict_history, str_from_date, str_to_date) to yield date: record entries?

I know how to convert datetime objects to any string format I want. However, my major pain points in this hurdle are:

  1. dicts aren't ordered.
  2. dict keys are strings.
  3. The dates are not continuous.

So far, this is what I can think of:

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

def get_records(history, start_date, end_date):
  fmt = "%Y-%m-%d"
  dt = timedelta(days=1)

  present_date = datetime.strptime(start_date, fmt)
  end_date = datetime.strptime(end_date, fmt)

  while present_date <= end_date:
    present_string = present_date.strftime(fmt)
    try:
      yield (present_string, history[present_string])
    except KeyError:
      pass
    present_date += dt

Is there a more efficient way to do that?

UPDATE (2011 Aug 2)
I found a SortedCollection class at ActiveState, also by Raymond Hettinger.

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More efficient than testing every date in an interval? How about converting the dict to a list of tuples, sorting the list, and then binary searching for the start and end of the interval? AKA don't store the data as a dict if you want to search by intervals. –  sverre Aug 1 '11 at 13:33
    
Given that your range is given as strings in the same format, and dates are properly ordered (Y M D), why not just iterate over the items in the dict and filter by "start <= key <= end"? –  pyroscope Aug 1 '11 at 13:35
    
@sverre: If I had history as a sorted list of tuples in the first place (which I could do, I have control as to how to format history), then binary searching through a list might be a good option. I was stopped in my tracks when I asked myself "How do I query the list for a date I want?" If you could compose an answer for that, I would very much welcome it. –  Kit Aug 1 '11 at 13:37
1  
Python 2.7 and 3.1 support ordered dictionaries. Have you looked into them? Older python implementation: pypi.python.org/pypi/ordereddict –  Warren P Aug 1 '11 at 13:46
1  
See the link. There's an add-on written by Raymond Hettinger. –  Warren P Aug 1 '11 at 13:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'd just iterate over the dictionary and return the items that match:

def get_records(history, start_date, end_date):
    for date, entry in history.iteritems():
        if start_date <= date <= end_date:
             yield date, entry

Note that your particular date format allows direct string comparison with < and > without converting to a datetime instance first.

Also note that the given function will return the matching items in no particular order.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but your solution (and my example in the question as well) had to iterate over the entire dictionary. I see myself getting over 3000 entries, where iterating over the whole thing might slow down significantly. –  Kit Aug 1 '11 at 13:41
    
@Kit: Your solution has to iterate over the days of the interval, mine has to iterate over the entries of the dictionary. I suggested my solution for readability and simplicity, not for performance. But 3000 doesn't seem to be an awfully large number, so probably this is fast enough. If it isn't, use a better suited data structure. –  Sven Marnach Aug 1 '11 at 13:47
    
Oh, right, I didn't notice my daily iteration. I'll see what I can get with your solution, or with a better data structure (which I have yet to find out). –  Kit Aug 1 '11 at 13:54

How about:

def get_records(history, start_date, end_date, format = "%Y-%m-%d"):
    present_date = datetime.strptime(start_date, format)
    end_date = datetime.strptime(end_date, format)
    return [(key, value) for key, value in history.items() if present_date <= datetime.strptime(history[key], format) <= end_date]
share|improve this answer
def get_records(history, str_from_date, str_to_date)
    return sorted((k,v) for k,v in history.iteritems() if str_from_date<=k<=str_to_date)
share|improve this answer

This only passes through the line of dates once, at the cost of sorting the list first.

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

def get_records(history, start_date, end_date):
  fmt = "%Y-%m-%d"

  start_date = datetime.strptime(start_date, fmt)
  end_date = datetime.strptime(end_date, fmt)

  dt = history.iteritems()
  dt = sorted(dt, key= lambda date: datetime.strptime(date[0], fmt))

  for date in dt:
      if datetime.strptime(date[0],fmt) > end_date:
          break
      elif datetime.strptime(date[0],fmt) >= start_date:
          yield(date[0], history[date[0]])
      else:
          pass
share|improve this answer
    
Phew! Fixed the obvious schoolboy error before anyone downvoted me! –  Chris Huang-Leaver Aug 1 '11 at 14:06
history = { "2008-11-17": 41,
            "2010-05-28": 82,
            "2008-11-14": 47,
            "2008-11-13": 60,
            "2008-11-12": 56,
            "2008-11-11": 55,
            "2008-11-10": 98,
            "2008-11-19": 94,
            "2008-11-18": 94,
            "2004-05-27": 82,
            "2004-05-26": 45,
            "2004-05-25": 70  }



def get_records(dict_history, str_from_date, str_to_date):

    for k,v in sorted(dict_history.items()):
        if k>str_to_date:
            break
        if k>=str_from_date:
            yield (k,v)

print history.items()
print
print list( get_records(history, '2005-05-21', '2008-12-25'))  

The dates are strings 'yyyy-mm-jj'

Sorting lexicographically these strings produces the same result as sorting them on the basis of the dates they represent.

sorted(dict_history.items()) is a list of tuples. Python sorts this list according the first elements of tuples.
Each key in the dictionary being unique , there is no ambiguity in this sorting.

Edit 1

Answering to your performance concern:

history = { "2008-11-17": 41,
            "2010-05-28": 82,
            "2008-11-14": 47,
            "2008-11-13": 60,
            "2008-11-12": 56,
            "2008-11-11": 55,
            "2008-11-11": 02,
            "2008-11-10": 98,
            "2008-11-19": 94,
            "2008-11-18": 94,
            "2004-05-27": 82,
            "2004-05-26": 45,
            "2004-05-25": 70  }
import bisect

def get_records(dict_history, str_from_date, str_to_date):
    sorted_keys  = sorted(dict_history.iterkeys())
    start = bisect.bisect_left(sorted_keys,str_from_date)
    end   = bisect.bisect_right(sorted_keys,str_to_date)
    for date in sorted(dict_history.iteritems())[start:end]:
        yield date

print history.items()
print
print list( get_records(history, '2005-05-21', '2008-12-25')) 
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