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I just downloaded the kFilter library (http://kalman.sourceforge.net/), and had some questions about its use that I couldn't find in the documentation. Has anyone used this library in the past?

My questions are basically these:

  1. The Step function of the eKFilter receives two vectors (u, and v). What do these vectors represent? The only reference I could find was the comment saying "// U u U-D Covariance Matrix (n, nn)" I assume that one of these vectors is supposed to represent the new measurement (presumably v). Is the other supposed to represent the co-variance of the measurement? How are these values expected to be inserted?

  2. Normally, the Kalman Filter will not be expecting measurements on regular time-intervals. Rather, I would expect that a time would accompany every reading indicating the actual time that it occurs. In the examples given, a constant value (called Period) is used. Moreover, none of the virtual functions in the EKFilter class can recieve any inputs. How can one use time as an input corresponding to a new measurement? Similarly, the example given has constant R and Q matrices. How can one use the co-variance as an input corresponding to a reading?

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Sorry, I've never used the library so can't help. However, the following has caught my eye: "Normally, the Kalman Filter will not be expecting measurements on regular time-intervals. Rather, I would expect that a time would accompany every reading indicating the actual time that it occurs." Could you point me to some books/papers that deal with the Kalman filter on irregularly-timed observations? Thanks –  NPE Aug 1 '11 at 14:13
    
@aix: irregular time steps can be easily introduced by changing the noises variances. –  Alexandre C. Aug 1 '11 at 14:20
    
@Alexandre C.: I see what you're saying. Would still love some to see some textbook (or more advanced) treatment of the subject. Any pointers? –  NPE Aug 1 '11 at 14:24
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@aix: no. I was taught Kalman filter as a sort of do-it-yourself-it-takes-under-one-page-of-computations thing. –  Alexandre C. Aug 1 '11 at 14:41
    
@aix check out the wikipedia page on Kalman Filters: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  David Aug 2 '11 at 6:55

1 Answer 1

u is the control input. It's usually something like linear and angular velocity.

v is now called z, it's the observation vector.

Data is usually interpolated so it's on a constant interval. Your measurement covariances, Q and R will be constant in the system as well.

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