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I am attempting to make consecuitve async ajax calls in order to paint user's schedules into a HTML table via jQuery. Each response returns a JSON serialized DataSet containing two tables: one of scheduled events and the other contains user info.

The problem I am having is that the user info seems to get mixed up with user events. That is, sometimes the user onfo doesn't change for different responses so the scheduled events are tied to an incorrect user. If I set the AJAX async property to false, all is well.

The whole point is to display the schedules one by one as the data is returned instead of making the page freeze until all data is returned.

Is there a way to ensure that the first JAX call completes before the subsequent call executes?

(Perhaps my understanding of setting async to false is incorrrect. Doesn't it mean that all data is harvested before code execution continues?)

Here is my current approach:

        //  When page loads
    $(document).ready(function () {
        // Get date range            
        debugger;
    //GetStartDate(), GetEndDate() populates date range
    //PopulateParams() does that for remaining parameters
        $.when(GetStartDate(), GetEndDate())
        .then(function () {
            PopulateParams();
            GetUserSchedule();
        })
        .fail(function () {
            failureAlertMsg();

        })
    });

    // Returns schedule for each person listed in between selected start and end dates
    function GetUserSchedule() {
         for (var i = 0; i < arrRequests.length; i++) {
            $.when(
            // Ajax call to web method, passing in string
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: URL/default.aspx/GetSchedules",
                data: arrRequests[i],   // example data: {"UserId":"6115","startDate":"\"7/1/2011\"","endDate":"\"7/31/2011\MoreVals: Vals}                    contentType: "application/json",
                dataType: "json",
                success: SuccessFunction,
                error: function (d) { alert('Failed' + d.responseText + '\nPlease refresh page to try again or contact administrator'); }
            })
            )
            .then(function () {

            }
            );
        }
    }

    // On successful completion of call to web method, paint schedules into HTML table for each user
    function SuccessFunction(data) {            
        if (data != null && data.d != null && data.d.Temp != null) {

        // Calls a bunch of functions to paint schedule onto HTML table
        // Data contains two tables: one contains user info and the other contains rows of info for each event for user
        // at times, the user info is not the correct user or the events are not correct for user
    }
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3 Answers 3

in the $.ajax({..

write:

 $.ajax({
     async: false,
     **rest of code**});
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1  
Is my understanding of setting async to false incorrrect? Doesn't it mean that all data is harvested before code execution continues?) –  Bengal Aug 1 '11 at 14:06
    
@Bengal - I believe your understanding is correct. However, if your second ajax call is after your first, and your first is flagged as "async:false", then the first call would indeed complete before the second call is launched. –  mikemanne Aug 1 '11 at 15:11
    
Excactly :) Just set the async to false on the first ajax request. –  Cort3z Aug 1 '11 at 15:12
    
Right, I failed to mention that I have done as you suggested, however that defeats the original purpose... to retrieve the first user's schedule, start to paint it onto the page while retrieving the subsequent user's schedule and so on. I had hoped someone could provide an example of making subsequent async calls instead of concurrent ones. I suspect that it might be achieved via recursion –  Bengal Aug 1 '11 at 16:52
    
As mentioned by others, my best bet, too, would be to use the success-callback to retrieve the next request. Somehow have a list of requests (switch-case function maybe) and then each time you request something, itterate a counter to make the next request. –  Cort3z Aug 2 '11 at 8:15

Maybe you can call the next method in the success function of the previous, you need to provide a way to know when to stop calling but you can add some information to your web service. So the next one only starts when the last one succeeds.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is how I solved the issue. Hopefully it will help someone else. There may be some typos... this is just meant to show general idea. I called my GetData method recursively:

    //  When page loads
    $(document).ready(function () {
        FunctionToBegin();
    });


    // Populates params and call method containing AJAX call
    function FunctionToBegin() {
        // Populate any required params here, including the first param required for the first AJAX call

        // The following block uses the jQuery.Deferred() object, introduced in jQuery 1.5
        // See http://api.jquery.com/category/deferred-object/
        // the object allows us to chain callbacks, **in the order specified**

        // Get date range
        $.when(GetStartDate(), GetEndDate())
            .then(function () {
      var $trCurrent = $('.DataRow:first');
                //Pass in first userID
                GetData($trCurrent.find('td:first').text().trim()); 
            })
                .fail(function () {
                    failureAlertMsg();
                }
           )
    }


    function GetData(userID) {
        // get the user id
        UserId = userID;
        // Create a json string containing data needed to retrieve the required data
        jsonTextStringified = null;
        jsonTextStringified = JSON.stringify({ UserId: UserId, startDate: startDate, endDate: endDate, AdditionalValues: AdditionalValues });
        // Ajax call to web method, passing in string
        $.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url: "/URL/default.aspx/WebMethod",
            data: jsonTextStringified,
            contentType: "application/json",
            dataType: "json",
            async: true,
            success: SuccessFunction,
            error: function (d) { alert('Failed' + d.responseText + '\nPlease refresh page to try again or contact administrator'); }
        });
    }

    function SuccessFunction(data) {
      if (data != null && data.d != null && data.d.Temp != null) {
    // Do useful stuff


    // Process next user id
            nextUserID = SomeMethod();
            if (nextUserID != 0) { GetData(nextUserID) }
        }
        else {
                 nextUserID = SomeMethod();
                 if (nextUserID != 0) {  GetData(nextUserID) }
            }
        }
    }

This general outline permits each async call to complete before processing the next call. In other words, the group of async calls don't execute all at once and thus, don't hammer the web method responsible for returning data. In my case, I was returning a dataset containing two tables and the tables returned were inconsistently accurate unless I set the async flag to false (not acceptable for my purpose), or followed the oulined approach.

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I didn't get the glory for the suggestion, but your answer is way more helpfull. –  Ernesto Aug 3 '11 at 17:15

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