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Here I would focus on custom application where I got degradation (no need for general discussion about fastness of threads against processes).

I've got MPI application on Java which solve some problem using iteration method. The schematic view to application bellow lets call it MyProcess(n), where "n" is the number of processes:

double[] myArray = new double[M*K];

for(int iter = 0;iter<iterationCount;++iter)
{
   //some communication between processes

   //main loop
   for(M) 
     for(K)
     {
        //linear sequence of arithmetical instructions
     }

   //some communication between processes
}

To improve performance I've decided to use Java threads (lets call it MyThreads(n)). The code is almost the same – myArray becomes matrix, where each row contains array for appropriate thread.

double[][] myArray = new double[threadNumber][M*K];


public void run()
{
  for(int iter = 0;iter<iterationCount;++iter)
  {
     //some synchronization primitives

     //main loop
     for(M) 
       for(K)
       {
          //linear sequence of arithmetical instructions

          counter++;
       }

     // some synchronization primitives
  }
}

Threads created and started using Executors.newFixedThreadPool(threadNumber).

The problem is that while for MyProcess(n) we got adequate performance(n in [1,8]), in case of MyThreads(n) performance degrades essentially(on my system by factor of n).

Hardware: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU X5355(2 processors, 4 cores on each)

Java version: 1.5(using d32 option).

At first I thought that got different workloads on threads, but no, variable “counter” shows, that number of iterations between different run of MyThreads(n) (n in [1,8]) are identical.

And it isn’t synchronization fault, because I have temporary comment all synchronization primitives.

Any suggestions/ideas would be appreciated.

Thanks.

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I am not clear what you are saying. I would expect 4 - 16 threads to be the optimal number of threads for you system. Depending on what you are doing. Which potions of code run independently/concurrent in different threads, and which portions are serialized? –  Peter Lawrey Aug 1 '11 at 14:34
    
Thanks for answer. Well, after commenting synchronization primitives remaining code is independant for all threads. It means at this moment each thread just compute its results and no communication. It will bring incorrect result matrix, but for debugging reasons dont care. –  manuk Aug 1 '11 at 14:52
    
Can you post some example value of M,K and iterationCount? –  user802421 Aug 1 '11 at 15:00
1  
Hardware: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU X5355(2 processors, 4 cores on each) that's like Peter told 16 logical cores. But do you have N different matrices, hence each core solves its own one? If so you can expect linear scaling by adding CPUs till you hit the memory bandwidth. if you attempt solving one matrix w/ all the cores available then it's totally different. –  bestsss Aug 1 '11 at 15:30
1  
You can check with jvisualvm to see if the threads are indeed running simultaneously and not waiting for something. –  biziclop Aug 1 '11 at 15:52
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1 Answer

There are 2 issues I see in your piece of code.


Firstly caching problem. Since you try to do this in multi thread/process I'd assume your M * K results in a large number; then when you do

    double[][] myArray = new double[threadNumber][M*K];

You are essentially creating an array of double pointer with size threadNumber; each pointing to a double array of size M*K. The interesting point here is that the threadNumber count of arrays are not necessarily allocated onto the same block of memory. They are just double pointers which can be allocated anywhere inside JVM heap. As a result, when multiple threads run, you might encounter a lot of cache miss and you end up reading memory many times, eventually slow down your program.

If the above is the root cause, you can try enlarge your JVM heap size, and then do

    double[] myArray = new double[threadNumber * M * K];

And have the threads operating on different segment of the same array. You should be able to see performance better.


Secondly synchronization issue. Note that double (or any primitive) array is NOT volatile. Thus your result on 1 thread isn't guaranteed to be visible to other threads. If you are using synchronization block this resolves the issue, as a side effect of synchronization is make sure visibility across threads; If not, when you are reading and writing the array, please always make sure you use Unsafe.putXXXVolatile() and Unsafe.getXXXVolatile() so that you can do volatile operations on arrays.

To take this further, Unsafe can also be used to create a continuous segment of memory which you can used to hold your data structure and achieve better performance. In your case I think 1) already do the trick.

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