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I have the following scenario(table below) where I would like to pick 'X' or 'Y' based on whether they are NULL or not.

  X         Y            pick
  null     not null        Y
  not null not null        X
  not null null            X

the rows containing the data 'X' and 'Y' or UNION ALLed like below:

  select 'X' as a
  union all
  select 'Y' as a

So I tried and got the following SQL but not sure about the "rownum<=1" part. This will work(for the case where both X and Y are not null) only if UNION ALL preserve the order in which I query the two rows.

  select a from 
  (
  select 'X' as a
  union all
  select 'Y' as a
  ) where a is not null and rownum<=1;

  select a from 
  (
  select null as a
  union all
  select 'Y' as a
  ) where a is not null and rownum<=1;

  select a from 
  (
  select 'X' as a
  union all
  select null as a
  ) where a is not null and rownum<=1;

Is the above right way to go about this?. Any insight would be much appreciated

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1  
The result of a UNION or UNION ALL is a set. Sets do not have an order. Even if you observe an apparent ordering in simple tests, you should not rely on such an order ever being present. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 1 '11 at 14:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want a specific order in SQL, you have to ask for it. You could probably extend your union as:

  select a from (
    select a,rownum as rn from 
    (
       select 'X' as a, 0 as Priority from dual
       union all
       select 'Y' as a, 1 as Priority from dual
    ) where a is not null order by Priority
  ) where rn = 1

Although I admit I'm not great with Oracle. I believe rownum does odd things in WHERE clauses, that's why I've introduced an extra level of querying.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Damien. Looks like this might do the trick. –  komedit1 Aug 1 '11 at 15:05
    
Two things: 1) you can't issue a select without a from clause in Oracle. If you're looking to fabricate a row, the standard way to do that is to select from dual. 2) I don't see the point of this query: column "a" can't possibly be null and the rownum filter will always remove the second half of the union. What's left is the equivalent of select 'X' as a from dual. –  Allan Aug 1 '11 at 15:55
    
@Allan - I was mimicking, as much as possible, the OPs queries. They have 3 identical queries, I've reproduced the first, but added the features I wished to illustrate. I said I wasn't great with Oracle –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 1 '11 at 16:08

Coalesce

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28286/functions023.htm

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please give an example with coalesce?. I had thought about using coalesce, but it is a function that requires multiple individual values and not multiple records. So I didn't know how to plug it into the query. –  komedit1 Aug 1 '11 at 14:42
    
I thought you said at the very beginning that you had a table with two columns, X and Y. If you don't, please make clearer what you do have. Coalese takes as arguments two values, usually two column values from the same row. –  Tim Aug 1 '11 at 14:51

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