Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is wrong with this function? It seems like a scope error (although I thought I had fixed that by placing each callable in the list, instead of using it directly). Error is max recursion depth reached (when calling comp(inv,dbl,inc))...

Note: the question is: why is it even recursing, not why it's reaching the max depth...

def comp(*funcs):
    if len(funcs) in (0,1):
        raise ValueError('need at least two functions to compose')
    # get most inner function
    composed = []
    print("appending func 1")
    composed.append(funcs[-1])
    # pop last and reverse
    funcs = funcs[:-1][::-1]
    i = 1
    for func in funcs:
        i += 1
        print("appending func %s" % i)
        composed.append(lambda *args, **kwargs: func(composed[-1](*args,**kwargs)))
    return composed[-1]

def inc(x):
    print("inc called with %s" % x)
    return x+1
def dbl(x):
    print("dbl called with %s" % x)
    return x*2
def inv(x):
    print("inv called with %s" % x)
    return x*(-1)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    comp(inv,dbl,inc)(2)

Traceback (if it helps):

appending func 1
appending func 2
appending func 3
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "comp.py", line 31, in <module>
    comp(inv,dbl,inc)(2)
  File "comp.py", line 17, in <lambda>
    composed.append(lambda *args, **kwargs: func(composed[-1](*args,**kwargs)))
  File "comp.py", line 17, in <lambda>
    composed.append(lambda *args, **kwargs: func(composed[-1](*args,**kwargs)))
  File "comp.py", line 17, in <lambda>
    composed.append(lambda *args, **kwargs: func(composed[-1](*args,**kwargs)))
  (...)
  File "comp.py", line 17, in <lambda>
    composed.append(lambda *args, **kwargs: func(composed[-1](*args,**kwargs)))
RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded while calling a Python object
share|improve this question
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/6035848/… and similar questions –  Jochen Ritzel Aug 1 '11 at 15:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The lambda function you create builds a closure over the composed variable:

composed.append(lambda *args, **kwargs: func(composed[-1](*args,**kwargs)))

This means that composed[-1] isn't evaluated when you create the lambda function, but when you call it. The effect is, that composed[-1] will be calling itself recursively again and again.

You can solve this problem by using a helper function (with its own scope) to create the lambda functions:

def comp2(f1, f2):
    return lambda *args, **kwargs: f1(f2(*args, **kwargs))

...
for func in funcs:
     composed.append(comp2(func, composed[-1]))
share|improve this answer
1  
The other problem is that for func in funcs loop, so the func in each lambda is the same. –  Jochen Ritzel Aug 1 '11 at 15:04
    
So I just tried doing it by explicitly calling composed[i], but it still has the same problem. Shouldn't it then just call composed[10](composed[9](composed[8](...)))? –  o1iver Aug 1 '11 at 15:05
    
I think what jochen just said might be the actual problem –  o1iver Aug 1 '11 at 15:05
    
@o1iver: The closure over composed causes the recursion, and the closure over func will cause wrong results to be calculated. Also the inc,... functions probably shouldn't return lambda functions, but normal values. –  sth Aug 1 '11 at 15:17
    
@sth: yes those functions were wrong –  o1iver Aug 1 '11 at 15:23

I don't know why you generate to many functions to begin with. There is a simple version of your code:

def compose(*funcs):
    if len(funcs) in (0,1):
        raise ValueError('need at least two functions to compose')

    # accepting *args, **kwargs in a composed function doesn't quite work
    # because you can only pass them to the first function.
    def composed(arg):
        for func in reversed(funcs):
            arg = func(arg)
        return arg

    return composed

# what's with the lambdas? These are functions already ...
def inc(x):
    print("inc called with %s" % x)
    return x+1
def dbl(x):
    print("dbl called with %s" % x)
    return x*2
def inv(x):
    print("inv called with %s" % x)
    return -x

if __name__ == '__main__':
    f = compose(inv,dbl,inc)
    print f(2)
    print f(3)
share|improve this answer
    
Yes the functions were wrong... copied them from the command line –  o1iver Aug 1 '11 at 15:29
    
Great answer. I was doing this way to complicated... And good point about the args only being for the first function. Thanks! –  o1iver Aug 1 '11 at 15:31
    
Although I just tried out something and sth's way of doing it allows you to use *args and **kwargs. –  o1iver Aug 1 '11 at 15:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.