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Table foobar is, for clarity, structured and has data as follows:

id, action_dt, status_id
1, '02-JUL-10', 'x'
1, '02-JUL-10', '2'
1, '02-JUL-10', NULL
2, '02-JUL-10', 'a'
2, '02-JUL-10', 'b'
3, '02-JUL-10', 'k'
3, '02-JUL-10', NULL
3, '03-JUL-10', 'k'
3, '03-JUL-10', NULL

I need a query that gets IDs such that for each ID a NULL value and a NOT NULL value exists per day. So, in the example dataset above, the query needs to return:

'02-JUL-10', 1
'02-JUL-10', 3
'03-JUL-10', 3

Yes, it can be done using something like:

SELECT
    nulls.action_dt
    , nulls.id 

FROM        (SELECT 
                action_dt
                , id 
            FROM        foobar 
            WHERE       status_id IS NULL
            GROUP BY    action_dt)   nulls

INNER JOIN (SELECT
                action_dt
                , id
            FROM        foobar 
            WHERE       status_id IS NOT NULL
            GROUP BY    action_dt)    non_nulls     ON nulls.action_dt = non_nulls.action_dt 
                                                        AND nulls.id = non_nulls.id



but as you can see, among other things, two subqueries and another iteration for the join...

The query I've been working on and have hopes for is of the form:

SELECT
    action_dt
    , id
FROM
    foobar
GROUP BY
    action_dt
    , id
    , CASE WHEN status_id IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
HAVING
    COUNT(prim_card_nb) > 1

but it doesn't quite return what I need (as you know, the HAVING clause applies to the underlying data that is being queried). Any ideas?

After all this, it seems a solution would be to have the above query in a subquery and filter it down that way, such as:

SELECT
    action_dt
    , id
FROM        (SELECT
                action_dt
                , id
            FROM
                foobar
            GROUP BY
                action_dt
                , id
                , CASE WHEN status_id IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
            ) repeat_ids_per_day
GROUP BY
    action_dt
    , id
HAVING
    COUNT(id) > 1

but I feel it can be better...

share|improve this question
    
While the marked answer is correct for my specific question, due to the requirements of the actual project that this stemmed from it seems that I will have to use the first query in my original post because, from a gui, a user must be able to filter down the report based off criteria. This dataset was dumbed down which does not contain the critera a user can filter by -- so it might seem doable in this by putting the critera in the WHERE clause, but the where clause applies to entire dataset while the filter criteria will need to apply to subsets of the dataset... –  stuck Aug 1 '11 at 18:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your idea is sound: in such a case you don't need a subquery, an aggregate is sufficient and should be more efficient. This should work:

SQL> SELECT action_dt, id
  2    FROM foobar
  3   GROUP BY action_dt, ID
  4  HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT CASE WHEN status_id IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) > 1;

ACTION_DT         ID
--------- ----------
02-JUL-10          1
02-JUL-10          3
03-JUL-10          3
share|improve this answer
    
Yes! You rock. I've actually used that before but it took me a while to understand why it worked. Here, I see why it works and understand it, thanks very much. I'd upvote this, too, but I don't have an account! –  stuck Aug 1 '11 at 15:34

I think you have to do some minor changes in your first posted query

as below -

SELECT
    nulls.action_dt, nulls.id 

FROM        
(SELECT 
                action_dt
                , id        
            FROM        foobar 
            WHERE       status_id IS NULL
            GROUP BY    action_dt,id
uniou all
SELECT
                action_dt
                , id
            FROM        foobar 
            WHERE       status_id IS NOT NULL
            GROUP BY    action_dt,id)  
group by action_dt, id
having count(*) >1

what you have posted there is not a correct, as in oracle database.. you can't include not grouped column name while selecting.. so please check that .. it could be your mistake .. and may be it was couse of problem..

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer! Your answer is an alternative solution but, as with the original query you modified, it is an inefficient query. –  stuck Aug 1 '11 at 15:50
    
That posted query is not the original one .. right .. else you will not add this question here.. well you have done so many mistake and as a teacher i should point student's mistake and alternative ways... just look at the query what you have posted ... it should not work also... then this is not original one... i just copy that because i want to give you direction on what you had work on –  pratik garg Aug 2 '11 at 5:19

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