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I've been trying to figure out a way to establish a P2P socket connection without using port forwarding or a VPN service.

I am aware of the TCP/UDP "hole punching" method, however, I am not willing to setup and run a server on my machine 24/7 for this purpose (besides my network is behind a NAT anyway...).

I was thinking about setting up servlet code on a URL that the host connects to, and when the client attempts to connect, it asks the servlet to establish the connection.

Is this plausible and/or could you help me get started (I have never written servlet code before)?

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what's the goal of the p2p? the usual way to resolve the issue is upnp en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Plug_and_Play but if you just need to connect 2 people through a server, well that's not much of a p2p. P2P is there to distribute the bandwidth and load of the server. –  bestsss Aug 1 '11 at 15:22
    
@bestsss file sharing. –  bgroenks Aug 1 '11 at 18:32
    
well, you need true p2p for that then and the upnp is the natural solution for. –  bestsss Aug 1 '11 at 19:29
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I am aware of the TCP/UDP "hole punching" method, however, I am not willing to setup and run a server on my machine 24/7 for this purpose (besides my network is behind a NAT anyway...).

I was thinking about setting up servlet code on a URL that the host connects to, and when the client attempts to connect, it asks the servlet to establish the connection.

If you have a servlet, then it must run on a server 24/7. So, you are only choosing between TCP/UDP hole punching and using a servlet.

Since you are behind a NAT, you probably should try to solve your connection issues via multicasting. Just have peers agree on an IP multicasting address and communicate their private ip address to each other. If they want to establish direct TCP connections, that should be enough. You don't need a central server/servlet.

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I am a bit confused. Could you show me an example of this technique? –  bgroenks Aug 4 '11 at 16:39
    
Multicasted messages on a LAN are received by all devices on the LAN if they listen to the agreed multicasting address. This is the initial/bootstrapping communication method between peers. Hence, no need for a central server when behind a LAN. –  JVerstry Aug 4 '11 at 17:48
    
Oh I was more referring to WAN connections... –  bgroenks Aug 4 '11 at 20:57
    
"my network is behind a NAT anyway" -> I misunderstood you. In this case, your servlet need to be available from a public IP address on a server. But, you need to learn about many more concepts too. Check the Practical JXTA II book available online at scribd. There is a chapter about NAT traversal and the techniques available. –  JVerstry Aug 4 '11 at 21:31
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