Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to implement a generic abstract class in my service layer. I am already using a simliar pattern in my dao layer and it works fine. I found a working example in the Spring in Practice v8 ebook. I am wondering if there is a way to autowire the following working code. (The code works but I have to call my helper method 'setDao' before I use any other method in the class)

Test class:

    public class App {


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ApplicationContext appContext = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("classpath:/applicationContext.xml");

        MyService service = (MyService)appContext.getBean("myService");

        service.setDao();

        Heading detail = new Heading();
        detail.setName("hello");

        service.save(detail);

        Heading dos = service.findById(Long.valueOf(1));
        System.out.println(dos);
    }
}

MyServiceImpl class

    @Service("myService")
public class MyServiceImpl extends AbstractServiceImpl<Heading> implements HeadingService {

    @Autowired
    private HeadingDao headingDao;

    public void setHeadingDao(HeadingDao headingDao) {
        this.headingDao = headingDao;
    }

    public void setDao() {
        super.setDao(this.headingDao);
    }

}

MyService interface

    public interface HeadingService extends AbstractService<Heading> {
    public void setDao();
}

AbstractServiceImpl class

    @Service
public abstract class AbstractServiceImpl<T extends Object> implements AbstractService<T> {

    private AbstractDao<T> dao;

    public void setDao(AbstractDao<T> dao) {
        this.dao = dao;
    }

    public void save(T t) {
        dao.save(t);
    }

    public T findById(Long id) {
        return (T)dao.findById(id);
    }

    public List<T> findAll() {
        return dao.findAll();
    }

    public void update(T t) {
        dao.update(t);
    }

    public void delete(T t) {
        dao.delete(t);
    }

    public long count() {
        return dao.count();
    }

}

AbstractService interface

    public interface AbstractService<T extends Object> {

    public void save(T t);
    public T findById(Long id);
    public List<T> findAll();
    public void update(T t);
    public void delete(T t);
    public long count();

}
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of having to call a method (setDao()) to allow your subclass to pass the DAO reference to your superclass, why reverse the direction and force the subclass to supply the DAO to the superclass?

for example:

public abstract class AbstractServiceImpl<T extends Object> implements AbstractService<T> {
    private AbstractDao<T> dao;

    abstract AbstractDao<T> getDao();

    public void save(T t) {
        getDao().save(t);
    }
}

public class FooServiceImpl extends AbstractServiceImpl<Foo> {
     @Autowired
     private FooDao fooDao;

     @Overrides
     public AbstractDao<Foo> getDao() {
         return fooDao;
     }
}

There is no need to call a method externally to kick the reference-passing-chain into action.

share|improve this answer
    
Btw, about your AbstractService - it seems as if your generic DAO and Service interfaces have almost identical method definitions. What is the point of this - why bother to have a separate Service layer from the DAO if a large amount of the Service methods just invoke the DAO method? Does every class using an AbstractService really need to be able to access the count() or findAll() methods? I would suggest considering reducing the size of the Service-layer methods available in this abstract class, and only writing methods that are truly needed - should reduce a lot of code. –  matt b Aug 1 '11 at 16:57
    
Thanks. That does make more sense. –  blong824 Aug 1 '11 at 16:58
add comment

Try making your MyServiceImpl implement InitializingBean, and change your setDao() method to be afterPropertiesSet(). It will automatically get called after the framework is done calling setters.

Or, (even more simple), just call setDao() in your setHeaderDao(...) method.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried your second suggestion and that throws a nullpointer exception. I will try your first suggestion now. I was trying to find a clean Spring way for the implementating class to declare what dao to use and then to use that in the abstract class with the generic crud opertaions. –  blong824 Aug 1 '11 at 16:16
    
Implementing InitializingBean worked and it let me remove the call in my test class. I think this should work. Have you used a pattern simliar to this before? I just thought it made sense to pull out simliar code between the services. –  blong824 Aug 1 '11 at 16:18
    
I haven't done the generic dao, but it makes sense. InitializingBean is the standard spring way to execute code after the framework has injected all values. Glad it worked for you. –  Kevin Aug 1 '11 at 16:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.