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This does not generate any output. How come?

$ echo 'this 1 2 3' | grep '\d\+'

But these do:

$ echo 'this 1 2 3' | grep '\s\+'
this 1 2 3

$ echo 'this 1 2 3' | grep '\w\+'
this 1 2 3
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1  
None of those work for me (Solaris). – spraff Aug 1 '11 at 16:07
    
Me neither. (Cygwin) Did you mean to have \+? What does that mean? – Eric Wilson Aug 1 '11 at 16:10
    
yes, I am on Ubuntu 10.04 , using bash. For BRE in grep you have to escape some characters. Try "Basic vs Extended Regular Expressions " in man grep. – abc Aug 1 '11 at 16:12
1  
@FarmBoy: + in a regex means "one or more of the previous token". In this case it's escaped because that's the syntax required by grep's default regex engine. – Daenyth Aug 1 '11 at 16:13
1  
@FarmBoy: + needs to be escaped if you're using grep; if you're using egrep, it doesn't. grep -E is equivalent to egrep (at least for the GNU version). – Keith Thompson Aug 1 '11 at 21:02
up vote 76 down vote accepted

grep's default mode is (iirc) POSIX regex, and \d is pcre. You can either pass -P to gnu grep, for perl-like regexps, or use [[:digit:]] instead of \d.

daenyth@Bragi ~ $ echo 1 | grep -P '\d'
1
daenyth@Bragi ~ $ echo 1 | grep '[[:digit:]]'
1
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Try this $ echo 'this 1 2 3' | grep '[0-9]\+'

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maybe "grep -E" option will help – bortunac Sep 23 '15 at 6:18

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