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Let me start off by saying that I am COMPLETELY new to programming. I have just recently picked up Python and it has consistently kicked me in the head with one recurring error -- "expected an indented block" Now, I know there are several other threads addressing this problem and I have looked over a good number of them, however, even checking my indentation has not given me better results. I have replaced all of my indents with 4 spaces and even rewritten the code several times. I'll post this counter assignment I got as an example.

option == 1
while option != 0:
    print "MENU"
    option = input()
    print "please make a selection"
    print "1. count"
    print "0. quit"
    if option == 1:
        while option != 0:
            print "1. count up"
            print "2. count down"
            print "0. go back"
            if option == 1:
                print "please enter a number"
                for x in range(1, x, 1):
                    print x
                elif option == 2:
                    print "please enter a number"
                    for x in range(x, 1, 1):
                elif option == 0:
                    break
                else:
                    print "invalid command"
    elif option == 0:
        break
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1  
Can you edit your post and give us the raw error message w/ line numbers please :-) – Prydie Aug 1 '11 at 16:27

Starting with elif option == 2:, you indented one time too many. In a decent text editor, you should be able to highlight these lines and press Shift+Tab to fix the issue.

Additionally, there is no statement after for x in range(x, 1, 1):. Insert an indented pass to do nothing in the for loop.

Also, in the first line, you wrote option == 1. == tests for equality, but you meant = ( a single equals sign), which assigns the right value to the left name, i.e.

option = 1
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1  
vim is a decent editor, but the keystrokes are [Ctrl]-[<] (in visual mode, add a motion beforehand in normal mode) – SingleNegationElimination Aug 1 '11 at 16:40
    
Thanks! This was very helpful. But now when I try to run my program it doesn't like option == 1 saying option is undefined – Zach Aug 1 '11 at 17:01
    
@Zach You meant to write option = 1 instead of option == 1 in the first line, didn't you? Updated the answer. – phihag Aug 1 '11 at 17:03
    
oh wow. yeah. thanks ^^ – Zach Aug 1 '11 at 17:06
    
+1 Very helpful answer, thanks – Anthony Feb 24 '13 at 22:54

Your for loop has no loop body:

elif option == 2:
    print "please enter a number"
    for x in range(x, 1, 1):
elif option == 0:

Actually, the whole if option == 1: block has indentation problems. elif option == 2: should be at the same level as the if statement.

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There are several issues:

  1. elif option == 2: and the subsequent elif-else should be aligned with the second if option == 1, not with the for.

  2. The for x in range(x, 1, 1): is missing a body.

  3. Since "option 1 (count)" requires a second input, you need to call input() for the second time. However, for sanity's sake I urge you to store the result in a second variable rather than repurposing option.

  4. The comparison in the first line of your code is probably meant to be an assignment.

You'll discover more issues once you're able to run your code (you'll need a couple more input() calls, one of the range() calls will need attention etc).

Lastly, please don't use the same variable as the loop variable and as part of the initial/terminal condition, as in:

            for x in range(1, x, 1):
                print x

It may work, but it is very confusing to read. Give the loop variable a different name:

            for i in range(1, x, 1):
                print i
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in python .....intendation matters, e.g.:

if a==1:
    print("hey")

if a==2:
   print("bye")

print("all the best")

In this case "all the best" will be printed if either of the two conditions executes, but if it would have been like this

if a==2:
   print("bye")
   print("all the best")

then "all the best" will be printed only if a==2

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Your last for statement is missing a body.

Python expects an indented block to follow the line with the for, or to have content after the colon.

The first style is more common, so it says it expects some indented code to follow it. You have an elif at the same indent level.

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This one is wrong at least:

            for x in range(x, 1, 1):
        elif option == 0:
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