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I have a class A, that is an abstract base class.(C++). Now, I have two classes B and C which inherit from A;

I have a virtual destructor in A; The constructor in class A is protected. Now, in the constructors of B and C, I have included a call to A's constructor.

B::B():A()
{
//do something
}

similarly for C

C::C():A()
{
//do something
}

Now, while compiling I'm getting linking errors.

    B.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "protected: __
thiscall A::A(void)" (??0A) referenced in function "protected: __thiscall B::B(void)" (??0B)

    C.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "protected:
__thiscall A::A(void)" (??0A@XZ)
      Error.

Please suggest how to resolve this.

Thanks, Karhtik.

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1  
Post the full code. There's bound to be a bug in the code you're not showing us. –  Kerrek SB Aug 1 '11 at 16:47
    
I cannot:(.Im not allowed to. –  Pavan Aug 1 '11 at 17:03
    
Try to construct a minimal example that reproduces your problem. Otherwise there's no real question here. –  n.m. Aug 1 '11 at 17:21
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Firstly, there's really no need to "call" the base class constructor explicitly. The default constructor of the base class will be called for you automatically.

Secondly, as @DeadMG already noted, the error you are getting suggests that you explicitly declared the A::A() constructor, but forgot to define it.

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This suggests that you never defined the default constructor of A when you declared it.

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no.they are in place:( –  Pavan Aug 1 '11 at 17:03
    
@user815961: If it was "in place", you wouldn't be getting these linker errors. No, the constructor definition is not "in place" (whatever you mean by that "in place") –  AndreyT Aug 1 '11 at 17:57
    
Hi all, actually, the abstract base class (A) has a constructor. And removing it from that abstract base class and all its child's (B & C) is resolving the issue. Is it that an abstract base class cannot have a constructor? stackoverflow.com/questions/1057221/… –  Pavan Aug 2 '11 at 4:25
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