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Hi Can any one tell me how to solve this problem in C#. I have an array consisting of N elements. elements in array can be positive and negative intgers. if A=[11, 3, 7, 1] i want to calculate minimum no of transformation steps required to make array elements equal. each element in array can be incremented or decremented by 1.

Array A will need 5 transformation steps to get A =[6, 6, 6, 6]

In very transformation each element has to be incremented or decremented by 1.

[11, 3, 7, 1] (initial array)
[10, 4, 6, 2] (after step 1)
[9, 5, 7, 3] (after step 2)
[8, 6, 6, 4] (after step 3)
[7, 7, 5, 5] (after step 4)
[6, 6, 6, 6] (after step 5)

Some in some arrays it may not be possible.

for example it is not possible with [1,4,7] to equalise elements to one number. In Such cases it should return -1

Thanks in advance.

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1  
What have you tried so far? – Ed Bayiates Aug 1 '11 at 18:10
    
By transformation step you mean incrementing / decrementing each element in the sequence if needed ? – Vasea Aug 1 '11 at 18:11
    
"qualize" means "equalize"? – user180326 Aug 1 '11 at 18:16
    
@user873244 with all respect to all writers on this question, I suggest to you to add algorithm(s) tag, to get more suggetions on this. On simple small arrays Jon's solution could be even correct, but not very sure if it's MATEMATICALLY correct for all types of destributions. – Tigran Aug 1 '11 at 18:31
    
@Tigran: The distribution is irrelevant - only the maximum and minimum are relevant. See my edited answer for more details. – Jon Skeet Aug 1 '11 at 18:38

Well presumably you just:

  • Find the maximum element
  • Find the minimum element
  • The number of steps required will be half the difference between the maximum and the minimum, rounding up

You'd find the mean of the maximum and minimum element, rounding either up or down - it won't affect the number of steps - and then on each transformation step, you'd adjust each array element towards that mean.

EDIT: It's hard to see how you could get more efficient than this. In each step, the maxmimum and minimum elements can't get more than 2 closer to each other (the maximum being reduced by one, the minimum being increased by one) so the number of steps is at least half the difference, rounding up. My solution also says how you get to that state in exactly half the difference, rounding up, so it's a concrete solution, with none better.

EDIT: Here's the code to perform the transformations. Not as efficient as it can be, but it works...

using System;
using System.Linq;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        int[] current = new[] { 1, 3, 9, 11, 5 };

        // Check all odd or all even    
        if (current.Select(x => x % 2).Distinct().Skip(1).Any())
        {
            Console.WriteLine("No solution!");
            return;
        }

        while (current != null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Join(" ", current));
            current = Transform(current);
        }
    }

    static int[] Transform(int[] input)
    {
        // We could do the "mean" calculation just once,
        // but it doesn't really matter for the sake of
        // demonstration
        int max = input.Max();
        int min = input.Min();
        if (max == min)
        {
            // Done
            return null;
        }

        int mean = (max + min) / 2;
        return input.Select(x => x > mean ? x - 1 : x + 1)
                    .ToArray();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Would that still work if you had an array like {300, 1, 1, 1, 1}? – StephenT Aug 1 '11 at 18:20
    
@StephenT: It would if I've understood the question correctly. I'm assuming that each "transformation step" can increment or decrement every element of the array (otherwise the example in the question doesn't work). For the example you give, you'd end up with every element at 150 or 151. – Jon Skeet Aug 1 '11 at 18:33
    
In very transformation each element has to be incremented or decremented by 1. – user873244 Aug 1 '11 at 18:33
    
@user873244: Or left alone, presumably? Otherwise it could only ever work if everything started with the same parity. – Jon Skeet Aug 1 '11 at 18:36
    
In very transformation each element has to be incremented or decremented by 1. [11, 3, 7, 1] (initial array) [10, 4, 6, 2] (after step 1) [9, 5, 7, 3] (after step 2) [8, 6, 6, 4] (after step 3) [7, 7, 5, 5] (after step 4) [6, 6, 6, 6] (after step 5) – user873244 Aug 1 '11 at 18:36

Is ROUND_DOWN(SUM(each) / N) works as expected?

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Does this work?

edit sorry, this:

public int[] Equalize(int[] arr)
{
        int min = int.MaxValue;
        int max = int.MinValue;
        int parity = arr[0] % 2;
        for (int i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++)
        {
            if (arr[i] % 2 != parity) return null;
            if (arr[i] < min) min = arr[i];
            if (arr[i] > max) max = arr[i];
        }
        int diff = (max - min) / 2;            
        int midVal = diff + min;
        return arr.Select(i => midVal).ToArray();
}
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