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what does Perl's /m modifier means from this example?

For example, let say I have the following information in the Example.txt text file. And each line ends with the newline character with a data record of Data The input record separator is set to:

 $/="__Data__";

 Example.txt

 __Data__
 This is test A.\n
 This is test B.\n
 This is test C.\n
 This is test D.\n

Question 1, after changing the input record separator to Data, would the ^ and $ characters be position as follow?

  ^__Data__
  This is test A.\n
  This is test B.\n
  This is test C.\n
  This is test D.\n$

Question 2, let say I use the /m modifier while having the input record separator still set to Data, would the ^ and $ characters be set to the following?

  ^__Data__$
  ^This is test A.\n$
  ^This is test B.\n$
  ^This is test C.\n$
  ^This is test D.\n$

  if(/__Data__/m)
  {
      print;
  }
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Have you experimented with this in Perl? –  Codie CodeMonkey Aug 1 '11 at 18:13
    
Yes but I'm not clear on how to test the positions of ^ and $. Using thi forum to help clear up my understanding. –  jbs Aug 1 '11 at 18:20
    
An editor cleaning up this question and title would help the new user not get downvoted for what turned out to be an interesting question. –  Mark Aug 2 '11 at 15:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

/$/ is not affected by $/.

Without /m,

  • /^/ matches the starts of the string. (/(?-m:^)//\A/)
  • /$/ matches at the end of the string, and before a newline at the end of the string. (/(?-m:$)//\Z//(?=\n\z)|\z/)

^__Data__\n          "^" denotes where /(?-m:$)/ can match
This is test A.\n    "$" denotes where /(?-m:$)/ can match
This is test B.\n
This is test C.\n
This is test D.$\n$

With /m,

  • /^/ matches the starts of the string and after a "\n". (/(?m:^)//\A|(?<=\n)/)
  • /$/ matches before a newline and at the end of the string. (/(?m:$)//(?=\n)|\z/)

^__Data__$\n           "^" denotes where /(?m:^)/ can match
^This is test A.$\n    "$" denotes where /(?m:$)/ can match
^This is test B.$\n
^This is test C.$\n
^This is test D.$\n$

I was asked about

...$\n$

First, let's demonstrate:

>perl -E"say qq{abc\n} =~ /abc$/ ? 1 : 0"
1

>perl -E"say qq{abc\n} =~ /abc\n$/ ? 1 : 0"
1

The point is to allow /^abc$/ to match both "abc\n" and "abc".

>perl -E"say qq{abc\n} =~ /^abc$/ ? 1 : 0"
1

>perl -E"say qq{abc} =~ /^abc$/ ? 1 : 0"
1
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1  
I've been using perl for 15+ years, know what m does quite well, and your post baffles me. Plover boiled this down to one sentence 9 years ago: /m: Make ^ match at beginning of line (after a newline) rather than beginning of string, and similarly $ at the end. perl.plover.com/yak/regex/samples/slide068.html –  Mark Aug 1 '11 at 18:41
    
very clear now, thanks ikegami but I don't understand ($\n$) This is test D.$\n$ –  jbs Aug 1 '11 at 18:42
    
@Mark, That's wrong. "$" can match elsewhere then at the end of the string, both with and without /m. And since the OP was asking about specifics... –  ikegami Aug 1 '11 at 19:29
    
@jbs, Added to my node to expand on $\n$. –  ikegami Aug 1 '11 at 19:35
    
thanks again ikegami for making this clear for me –  jbs Aug 1 '11 at 20:47

Your assumption is correct, multiline causes ^ and $ to match the beginning and end of the string, whereas without it you match between newlines (and string ends).

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