Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is slightly different than the question posed just below this one. Suppose I have a container class which has two template parameters, the first of which is a type, the second of which is the size of the container.

Now we have multiple containers with a different container storage size. Essentially, the container functions (all the public ones, anyway) only really care about T; N is only used to allocate local storage (an allocator is used if N is not enough).

I have put together a simple example implementation that showcases the problem I am having.

#include <iostream>

template <typename T, size_t N = 10>
class TestArray
{
public:
    T Local[N];

    class Iterator
    {
    public:
        T* Array;
        int Index;      

        Iterator() : Array(NULL), Index(-1) { }
        Iterator(T* _array, int _index) : Array(_array), Index(_index) { }

        bool operator == (const Iterator& _other) const 
        { 
             return _other.Index == Index && _other.Array == Array; 
        }

        bool operator != (const Iterator& _other) const 
        { 
            return !(*this == _other); 
        }

        template <size_t _N>
        Iterator& operator = (const typename TestArray<T, _N>::Iterator &_other)
        {
            Array = _other.Array;
            Index = _other.Index;

            return *this;
        }

        void Next() { ++Index; }
        void Prev() { --Index; }

        T& Get() { return Array[Index]; }
    };

    T& operator [] (const int _index) { return Local[_index]; }

    Iterator Begin() { return Iterator(Local, 0); }
    Iterator End() { return Iterator(Local, N); }

    template <size_t _N>
    void Copy(const TestArray<T, _N> &_other, int _index, int _count)
    {   
        int i;

        for (i = 0; i < _count; i++)
            Local[_index + i] = _other.Local[i];
    }   
};

This is really a two part question. The first part of which I posted earlier: Template container with multiple template parameters interacting with other template containers with a different template parameter. For the second part, I'm trying to use it as follows:

int main() {

    TestArray<int> testArray1;
    TestArray<int, 25> testArray2;

    TestArray<int>::Iterator itr;

    itr = testArray1.Begin();

    for (itr = testArray1.Begin(); itr != testArray1.End(); itr.Next())
    {
        itr.Get() = itr1.Index;
    }

    testArray2.Copy(testArray1, 0, 10);

    for (itr = testArray2.Begin(); itr != testArray2.End(); itr.Next())
    {
        std::cout << itr.Get() << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Here is an IDEONE link: http://ideone.com/GlN54

When compiled with gcc-4.3.4, I get the following:

prog.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
prog.cpp:67: error: no match for ‘operator=’ in ‘itr = testArray2.TestArray<T, N>::Begin [with T = int, unsigned int N = 25u]()’
prog.cpp:10: note: candidates are: TestArray<int, 10u>::Iterator& TestArray<int, 10u>::Iterator::operator=(const TestArray<int, 10u>::Iterator&)
prog.cpp:67: error: no match for ‘operator!=’ in ‘itr != testArray2.TestArray<T, N>::End [with T = int, unsigned int N = 25u]()’
prog.cpp:19: note: candidates are: bool TestArray<T, N>::Iterator::operator!=(const TestArray<T, N>::Iterator&) const [with T = int, unsigned int N = 10u]

In VS2010, I get the following:

1>------ Build started: Project: testunholytemplatemess, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
1>  main.cpp
1>c:\users\james\documents\testproj\testunholytemplatemess\testunholytemplatemess\main.cpp(67): error C2679: binary '=' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'TestArray<T,N>::Iterator' (or there is no acceptable conversion)
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int,
1>              N=25
1>          ]
1>          c:\users\james\documents\testproj\testunholytemplatemess\testunholytemplatemess\main.cpp(34): could be 'TestArray<T>::Iterator &TestArray<T>::Iterator::operator =(const TestArray<T>::Iterator &)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int
1>          ]
1>          while trying to match the argument list '(TestArray<T>::Iterator, TestArray<T,N>::Iterator)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int
1>          ]
1>c:\users\james\documents\testproj\testunholytemplatemess\testunholytemplatemess\main.cpp(67): error C2679: binary '!=' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'TestArray<T,N>::Iterator' (or there is no acceptable conversion)
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int,
1>              N=25
1>          ]
1>          c:\users\james\documents\testproj\testunholytemplatemess\testunholytemplatemess\main.cpp(19): could be 'bool TestArray<T>::Iterator::operator !=(const TestArray<T>::Iterator &) const'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int
1>          ]
1>          while trying to match the argument list '(TestArray<T>::Iterator, TestArray<T,N>::Iterator)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int
1>          ]

I thought the Iterator& operator = would make it so that this assignment operator should work, but apparently not. Perhaps I am being thick but I am failing to determine the correct solution here. Does anyone have any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
You need the Big Three! You have a default constructor and a assignment overload, but you don't have a copy constructor on you Iterator! – Bob Fincheimer Aug 1 '11 at 18:19
    
@Bob He uses a default copy constructor, no? – BЈовић Aug 1 '11 at 18:22
    
@VJo, just noting that the Big Three is important, it isn't an answer to the problem. The default copy constructor in this instance is alright, but it is always good practice to follow the law of Big Three. – Bob Fincheimer Aug 1 '11 at 18:23
    
@Bob - this was just contrived example code. The actual containers and iterators all have the big three. :) – James Aug 1 '11 at 19:24
    
@James, cool james, responsible C++ – Bob Fincheimer Aug 1 '11 at 19:26
up vote 6 down vote accepted

TestArray<T, 1> and TestArray<T, 2> are different types, and so are TestArray<T, 1>::Iterator and TestArray<T, 2>::Iterator. The assignment cannot work! (Your itr is a different type from the type of testArray2.Begin().)

The entire construction seems very dubious to me -- is this really necessary? What are you trying to achieve? Have you looked at std::array?


Update: It works if you supply the template parameters explicitly:

  for (itr.operator=<int,25>(testArray2.Begin());
       itr.operator!=<int,25>(testArray2.End());
       itr.Next())
  {
    std::cout << itr.Get() << std::endl;
  }

I'm not entirely sure why the parameters cannot be deduced from the arguments, and I am looking forward to a good explanation -- in the meantime, I put the full code on Ideone, though it doesn't compile there, but it does with my GCC 4.6.1.

share|improve this answer
    
I had assumed the overridden operator = would allow for the assignment between the different types. The underlying type would still be TestArray<T, 10>, but it could be assigned using the overridden operator. – James Aug 1 '11 at 19:28
    
Here is a IDEOne or this answer: ideone.com/lnJE7 – Bob Fincheimer Aug 1 '11 at 19:31
    
Well, the error messages definitely show that the compiler is looking for the same type -- did you give us the correct code? The != operator is definitely not templated! – Kerrek SB Aug 1 '11 at 19:32
    
Tried it out (ideone.com/UHt5u) but still failing to match... – James Aug 1 '11 at 19:38
    
I found a partial solution... you should also implement a const_iterator in parallel to the existing non-const version... – Kerrek SB Aug 1 '11 at 20:20

When you use default template arguments, the compiler simply automatically supplies the defaults, but they are still part of the template definition. In your case, TestArray<int> is the same as TestArray<int, 10>. If you want it to inter-operate between TestArray<T, N> and TestArray<T, M>, you'll probably want to use template functions.

Edit: The only solution I've been able to come up with is to break the iterator out to it's own class, then it works as desired. What I can't tell you is why it doesn't work. My guess is it's because it doesn't like searching for the inner classes for possible template expansions. Either way, here's what I did.

#include <iostream>

template <typename T, size_t N = 10> class TestArray;

template<typename T, size_t N> 
    class TIterator
    {
    public:
      T* Array;
      int Index;      

      TIterator() : Array(NULL), Index(-1) { }
      TIterator(T* _array, int _index) : Array(_array), Index(_index) { }

      bool operator == (const TIterator& _other) const 
      { 
    return _other.Index == Index && _other.Array == Array; 
      }

      bool operator != (const TIterator& _other) const 
      { 
    return !(*this == _other); 
      }

      TIterator& operator = (const TIterator& _other) {
    Array = _other.Array;
    Index = _other.Index;
    return *this;
      }

      template <size_t M>
      bool operator == (const TIterator<T, M>& _other) const 
      { 
    return _other.Index == Index && _other.Array == Array; 
      }

      template <size_t M>
      bool operator != (const TIterator<T, M>& _other) const 
      { 
    return !(*this == _other); 
      }

      template< size_t M>
      TIterator& operator = (const TIterator<T, M>& _other) {
    Array = _other.Array;
    Index = _other.Index;
      }

      void Next() { ++Index; }
      void Prev() { --Index; }

      T& Get() { return Array[Index]; }
    };



template <typename T, size_t N>
class TestArray
{
public:
  T Local[N];

  typedef TIterator<T, N> Iterator;

  T& operator [] (const int _index) { return Local[_index]; }

  Iterator Begin() { return Iterator(Local, 0); }
  Iterator End() { return Iterator(Local, N); }

  template <size_t _N>
  void Copy(const TestArray<T, _N> &_other, int _index, int _count)
  {   
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < _count; i++)
      Local[_index + i] = _other.Local[i];
  }   
};
int main() {

  TestArray<int> testArray1;
  TestArray<int, 25> testArray2;
  TestArray<double, 10> testArray3;

  TestArray<int>::Iterator itr;

  itr = testArray1.Begin();

  for (itr = testArray1.Begin(); itr != testArray1.End(); itr.Next())
    {
      itr.Get() = itr.Index;
    }

  testArray2.Copy(testArray1, 0, 10);


  for (itr = testArray2.Begin(); itr != testArray2.End(); itr.Next())
    {
      std::cout << itr.Get() << std::endl;
    }


  return 0;
}

Note, I had TIterator use both type arguments, even though it didn't technically use the second template argument, just to show that it worked.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, which is what I was trying to accomplish with the template operator =, but it still seems to disagree with my methods. – James Aug 1 '11 at 19:30
    
Thanks for the update. I think this is telling us that it is a legal construct but the compiler just won't play ball because it is an inner class. – James Aug 2 '11 at 15:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.