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Im new to .Net and I wondering if you have to re-create a table server control on every postback. I'm having a problem when a user clicks a button which adds a row to the table. It works fine up to about 50 rows being added then the page is extremely slow.

Here is my code:

Protected Sub Page_Load(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Me.Load
     For a = 1 To txtRowCount.text

      tblrow = New TableHeaderRow

     'Adds the inputbox to add weight
      tblcell = New TableCell
      inputText = New TextBox
       inputText.ID = "input_point_type" & a
       tblcell.Controls.Add(inputText)
       inputText.Width = 150
       tblrow.Cells.Add(tblcell)

     table_name.Rows.Add(tblrow)
     next 
End Sub

Protected Sub btnAddSeat_Click(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As EventArgs) Handles btnAddSeat.Click
     tblrow = New TableHeaderRow

    'Adds the inputbox to add weight
     tblcell = New TableCell
     inputText = New TextBox
     inputText.ID = "input_point_type" & a
     tblcell.Controls.Add(inputText)
     inputText.Width = 150
     tblrow.Cells.Add(tblcell)

     table_name.Rows.Add(tblrow)
End Sub
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Can you post your code? Also, can you explain more what you mean about "user is adding a row every postback"? –  Chase Florell Aug 1 '11 at 19:11

1 Answer 1

It's important to understand what happens when a postback is triggered. I'll run through a typical scenario:

  1. A user clicks on a button on your web page that causes a postback
  2. The web browser sends an http request to your web server
  3. The web browser throws away the current DOM for your page. It will keep an image loaded of the old page to provide continuity while waiting for the next to load, but this image is dead -- like a screenshot.
  4. The web server receives the http request from the browser and creates a brand new Page object to handle the request. Anything left over from prior instances of your Page class doesn't exist.
  5. The .Net runtime executes the entire ASP.Net life cycle from start to finish on the new Page object... not just the event that was triggered.

    5a. An early step in the life cycle is to restore viewstate for the Page object. Viewstate is a hidden html input element that tracks information about postbacks. This is what makes your pages seem like they are a continuously running program. But viewstate can only do so much and it comes with a price.

  6. The web server sends an http response based on the Page object to the browser.

  7. The Page object is destroyed. Nothing remains on the server from this request that wasn't explicitly added to the Session.
  8. The web browser builds a new DOM based on the response from the server

Because the page gets progressively slower, I suspect that one of two things is happening:

  1. The viewstate is getting too large and making the page appear slow. This is expected with large grids or tables using viewstate if you have users with slow connections, but not expected if everyone is on the local LAN.
  2. The entire grid is appended to the viewstate with each change.

In either case, what you probably want to do is avoid relying on viewstate at all for grids or tables. Rebuild the table on each request. This may sound slow, and it is, but remember that the alternative is asking users to upload the contents of the grid on each request. Even users with fast broadband connections often have slow upload rates. A database server with only 1ms (or less) latency and a gigabit (or faster) connection to your web server is often the preferred choice waiting on a large http request from a user located halfway across the country.

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