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I have a long polling request on my page. The script on the server side is set to timeout after 20 seconds.

So, when the long polling is "idling", and the user presses another button, the sending of that new request is delayed until the previous script times out.

I can't see anything wrong with the code on jQuery side. Why is the onclick-event delayed?

function poll()
{
$.ajax({
    url: "/xhr/poll/1",
    data: {
        user_id: app.user.id
    },
    type: "POST",
    dataType: "JSON",
    success: pollComplete,
    error: function(response) {
        console.log(response);
    }
});
}

function pollComplete()
{
    poll();
}

function joinRoom(user_id)
{
$.ajax({
    url: "/xhr/room/join",
    dataType: "JSON",
    type: "POST",
    data: {
        user_id: app.user.id,
        room_id: room.id
    }
});
}

<button id="join" onclick="javascript:joinRoom(2);">Join</button>

############ PHP Controller on /xhr/poll

$time = time();
while ((time() - $time) < 20)
{
    $updates = $db->getNewStuff();

    foreach ($updates->getResult() as $update)
        $response[] = $update->getResponse();

    if (!empty($response))
        return $response;
    else
        usleep(1 * 1000000);

    return 'no-updates';
}

Could the "usleep" be the problem?

XHR Screenshot

share|improve this question
    
is the problem is there in localhost too?? –  Praveen Prasad Aug 3 '11 at 20:49
1  
Does the PHP code for either AJAX call utilize sessions? –  Chris Baker Aug 3 '11 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If you use sessions in the AJAX handling functions, you will run in to an issue where the disk session data is locked by the first request, so each subsequent request ends up waiting for the session data to be available before it proceeds. In effect, this makes asynchronous calls block one another, you end up with linear responses to the requests in chronological order - synchronous. (here's a reference article)

A solution is to use session_write_close (docs) to close out the session as soon as you don't need it any more. This allows other subsequent requests to proceed because the session data will be "unlocked".

This, however, can get confusing as well. If you call session_write_close right before you return a response, then you aren't going to do yourself any favors because the session would have been unlocked as soon as the response was sent. Thus, it needs to be called as early as possible. If you are using post-back style architecture for AJAX request, this isn't so bad, but if you have a larger framework and your request handler is only a part of it, you'll have to explore a more top-level solution to non-blocking session usage so your subcomponents are not closing a session that the framework expects is still open.

One route is to go with database session. There are pros and cons to this solution which are beyond the scope of this answer - check Google for exhaustive discussion. Another route is to use a function that opens a session, adds a variable, then closes it. You risk race conditions with this solution, but here's a rough outline:

function get_session_var($key, $default=null) {
    if (strlen($key) < 1)
        return null;
    if (!isset($_SESSION) || !is_array($_SESSION)) {
        session_start();
        session_write_close();
    }
    if (array_key_exists($key, $_SESSION))
        return $_SESSION[$key];
    return $default;
}
function set_session_var($key, $value=null) {
    if (strlen($key) < 1)
        return false;
    if ($value === null && array_key_exists($key, $_SESSION)) {
        session_start();
        unset($_SESSION[$key]);
    } elseif ($value != null) {
        session_start();
        $_SESSION[$key] = $value;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
    session_write_close();
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Explain the down vote please - this answer is completely factual and accurate. –  Chris Baker Aug 3 '11 at 21:14
1  
I didn't exactly used your proposed solution, but the hint with session_write_close() was perfect! My requests were using sessions, and disabling them worked perfectly fine. –  Florian Peschka Aug 4 '11 at 12:49
1  
session_write_close() solved my problem, thanks! –  Brian Glaz Feb 2 '12 at 18:08

This sounds consistent with the 2 request rule - browsers only allow two concurrent connections to the same host at any one given time. That having been said, you should be fine with a long poll (receive) and send channel. Are you starting the long poll after page load using $(function(){...? Are you sure the request is being delayed on the client, and not in the browser? What are you seeing in firebug?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I am sure, because the request doesn't even show up in firebug for seconds. But when the polling ends and starts from the beginning, the request shows up, just like in the screenshot above. –  Florian Peschka Aug 2 '11 at 5:16
    
I tested the AJAX alone, without the polling, and it took around 800ms to complete. When the polling is running, it always takes more than 2 seconds. –  Florian Peschka Aug 2 '11 at 8:01
    
I agree here. Although newer browsers allow more (FF allows 6 and IE 8 allows 8 I guess). –  Mrchief Aug 3 '11 at 20:46
    
As has been mentioned (sort of), this issue is mainly related to IE 8 and below (weblogs.asp.net/mschwarz/archive/2008/07/21/…) As mentioned in the link, however, the HTTP spec suggests that clients should limit the number of concurrent connections. This is why a CDN is suggested - the CDN is a different domain name and thus allows you to bypass the concurrency restrictions of user agents. All that said, I don't think that is entirely the OP's problem :) –  Chris Baker Aug 3 '11 at 21:13

One thing you can do, you can abort the running poll and run your request first and then again start the poll.

//make sure pollJqXhr.abort is not undefined
var pollJqXhr={abort:$.noop}; 

function poll()
{
    //assign actual jqXhr object
    pollJqXhr=jQuery.ajax({youroptions});
}

function pollComplete()
{
   poll();
}


function joinRoom(user_id)
{
   //pause polling
   pollJqXhr.abort();

   jquery.ajax({
           /*options here*/
           success:function()
           {
                /*Your codes*/

                //restart poll
                poll()
           }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Seems like this is treating the symptom rather than the cause –  Chris Baker Aug 3 '11 at 21:07

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