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I want to create an app for iOS that utilizes a random 80 bit number but I am virtually certain that the current hardware can't handle numbers that large. So what's a good way to break the number into smaller pieces? Thus far the best I can think of is to break it into 4 20 bit blocks, but I'm not happy with how much processor capacity doing it that way takes up. Thank you for any help you can give me.

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3  
What do you want to do with that number? –  omz Aug 1 '11 at 20:07
    
You're talking integers here, I assume? –  Brad Larson Aug 1 '11 at 21:19
    
I am trying to create a Keno app. Keno features an array of 80 numbers(1-80). My idea is to represent the board as a binary number where each 0 means the "number" is not selected and each 1 means it is. I feel this will be substantially faster than generating a series of 20 random numbers and then comparing each one against another set of up to 20 user selected numbers. –  1every Aug 1 '11 at 21:32
2  
I feel that performance almost certainly won't be an issue here. Have you tried profiling your code and found where the bottleneck is? –  Sedate Alien Aug 1 '11 at 21:52

3 Answers 3

How about two ints and a short? That'll get you 32 + 32 + 16 = 80 bits. I can't tell what you're trying to do, but I probably wouldn't worry about processor capacity at this point.

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If you want to do calculations with that number, you're probably better off using an existing library, such as GMP instead of developing your own. If it's just used as a hash, cryptographic key, or something like that, you should use NSData or a raw byte array.

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Wouldn't it be plenty efficient to make a class that malloc's 80 booleans? the BOOL type is already "true/false", and the extra memory overhead is a minimal concern, equivalent to two or three hard-coded strings' worth of memory. I'll try for an example below:

UN-TESTED CODE :

@interface KenoBoard : NSObject{

    BOOL * boardSelections;

}

-(BOOL)selectionForPosition:(int)number;
-(void)setSelection:(BOOL)selection forPosition:(int)number;

@end

@implementation KenoBoard

-(id)init{
    if(self = [super init]){
        boardSelections = calloc(80*sizeof(BOOL));
    }
    return self;
}

-(void)dealloc{
    free(boardSelections);
    [super dealloc];
}

-(BOOL)selectionForPosition:(int)number{
    if (number >= 80){
        ...make a NSException here
        @throw exception
    }
    return boardSelections[number];
}

-(void)setSelection:(BOOL)selection forPosition:(int)number{
    if (number >= 80){
        ...make a NSException here
        @throw exception
    }
    boardSelections[number] = selection;  
}

@end
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A BOOL will not be one bit because BOOL is not a true native type of the language, it is defined in objc.h as typedef signed char BOOL; –  Nathan Day Aug 3 '11 at 8:07
    
Thanks @Nathan, updated. On that note, any chance there's a reference on a native 1-bit boolean for C? I couldn't find one. –  Alex Gosselin Aug 4 '11 at 2:35
    
Not really but you can specify the number of bit a field in a struct takes up for example struct foo { int a : 2; int b : 1; int c : 4; } –  Nathan Day Aug 4 '11 at 8:59

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