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I am trying to better understand the AS3 OOP structure and organization, but I am having some problems wrapping my head around it. I want to create multiple class files and it seems that best practice is not to and to put all classes in one file? I have searched for hours on the web and came up with little for good examples. Maybe seperate files is not the way to go while using AS3, but to me it only makes sense for modularzation. The files I have been playing with are:

  • Main.fla
  • Main.as (document class)
  • TestOne.as
  • TestTwo.as
  • TestThree.as
  • TestFour.as
  • TestFive.as

I have created a folder called classes to house all class files except the Main.as which resides with the FLA.

All five Test classes are the same code except the file name and class name.

Here is how I am importing the files:

Main.as

package classes
{
import flash.display.MovieClip;

import classes.TestOne;
     import classes.TestTwo;
     import classes.TestThree;
     import classes.TestFour;
     import classes.TestFive;

public class Init extends MovieClip
{
    trace("This is Main Class");
    var testOne : TestOne = new TestOne;
}
}

TestOne.as

package classes
{
import flash.display.MovieClip;

public class TestOne extends MovieClip
{
    trace("This is TestOne");

    public function testing():String
    {
        return "This is the testing method";
    }
}
}

Are the above examples I created good AS3 OOP practices? I understand these are real basic classes, but I think it should get the point arossed.

I am using CS3

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Might be good to look at the Flex SDK coding conventions and best practices. It is a point by point rundown of how you should be using ActionScript 3. There is quite a bit of OOP stuff scattered throughout, so take a good skim through it. I think it is worth any new or experienced AS3 devs to have a read, because there is a lot of useful information there.

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Thanks you for the link, there is a ton of information there. I think this is what I was looking for ;) –  Mike Aug 1 '11 at 21:57

OOP is a big subject but here is a good primer.

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Thanks for the link Nathan, great information, but it showed multple objects and nothing about multiple classes and common practices for ogranization ;) –  Mike Aug 1 '11 at 20:47

ActionScript 3 design patterns will be also useful for you.

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http://www.adobe.com/devnet/actionscript/learning.html

Also a good link for learning, as3.

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As Nathan said, big subject.

The thing about having all classes in one file is related to the topic "visibility of a class" and "access modifiers".

The modifier is that what is written before the class keyword. It can be public or internal. Internal means, that only code that is placed in the same directory (package) of the internal class can create an object of it. Public means, any code can create an instance of the class. Random link via google: http://flexmaster.blog.co.in/2010/05/20/action-script-use-access-modifiers-with-classes-and-class-members/

You are allowed to have multiple classes in one file. But then only one can have the modifier public. All others need to be internal. If you leave out the modifier, a class is by default internally visible. An internal class in a multiple classes file can be accessed only from within this file.

There are two more modifiers: protected and private. Both are applicable only to properties or methods. As an advanced developer you can even define you own modifier by using namespaces.

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Thanks guys, I guess my knowledge of OOP is less than I thought, haha. I am gonna have to read up more on it. Thanks to the both of you! –  Mike Aug 1 '11 at 21:09
    
you are welcome. –  Jens Struwe Aug 1 '11 at 21:10

The rules of OOP still apply to AS3
1) Encapsulation.
2) Inheritance.
3) Abstraction.
4) Polymorphism.

Apply them or not is your choice but it is good practice.
And don't forget the most important rule "KISS" (keep it simple stupid)

I also want to point out your code has an error

package classes
{
import flash.display.MovieClip;

public class TestOne extends MovieClip
{
    trace("This is TestOne");// this line is not inside a function and will most undoubtly error out your app.

    public function testing():String
    {
        return "This is the testing method";
    }
}
}
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Thanks The_asMan, the hardest thing for me is to apply KISS! I don't know why my mind cannot see that, but I do try. I think it comes with lack of knowledge :) What I was trying to do was practice calling methods. –  Mike Aug 1 '11 at 21:49
    
Think of objects for example buttons. All objects have attributes( label,backgroundcolor,useHandCursor...). When creating a class you need to determine what attributes it will have. Here is a good one just look at all of its subclasses. help.adobe.com/en_US/FlashPlatform/reference/actionscript/3/… –  The_asMan Aug 1 '11 at 21:58
    
One thing you will run into. Is a class will get bigger and bigger as you work on it. Then you will wonder how big until I should break it up into a few classes? This is something that happens to everyone, and frequently. But if you follow the rules sub-classing will become easier. –  The_asMan Aug 1 '11 at 22:02

I think you either did something wrong when you copied the code into SO or you're not placing the trace statements correctly. You need to place the trace("This is TestOne"); inside a constructor in TestOne.as, like this:

public function TestOne() {
    trace("This is TestOne");
}

The same goes for the code inside the Init class, which now reads:

trace("This is Main Class");
var testOne : TestOne = new TestOne;

but should be(note the bracers after new TestOne):

public function Init() {
    trace("This is Main Class");
    var testOne : TestOne = new TestOne();
}

What happens when you run your SWF, is that the constructor of the class Init will:

1) Trace "This is Main Class" to your console.

2) It will construct a new object(thus the name constructor) by calling the constructor of the class TestOne.

If you were to add this line to the end of the constructor in the class Init:

testOne.testing();

you should see this in the console: "This is the testing method".

If you would now comment out the line: var testOne : TestOne = new TestOne(); and run the SWF again, you'll get an error telling you something is null. This is because you attempt to call the method testing on an object that does not exist.

I do realize this is primarily fixing some coding errors of yours, and not so much helping you understand OOP. But hopefully you can pick up some help regarding object construction. I see some answers already mention key OOP principle that you really should look into.

Edit:

Remember that duplicating code is never a good thing, so if you find that all of the classes TestOne - TestFive contain the same code, except for some minor detail. You should probably change them into one class.

In your case you could for example change TestOne so that the constructor accepts a String, and then in your testing function you could just trace that String. By changing your TestOne class into the following you effectively get rid of 4 other classes. You also encapsulate a String inside of the class TestOne.

package classes {
    import flash.display.MovieClip;

    public class TestOne extends MovieClip {

        private var message : String;

        public function TestOne(myMessage:String) {
            message = myMessage;

            trace("This is TestOne");
        }

        public function testing() : String {
            return message;
        }
    }
}
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@ Bakapii, the only reason I duplicated the code was so I can practice applying multiple classes. I wanted to try and get a working model down so I can expand more on it to help learn :) Thank you for your response btw. –  Mike Aug 1 '11 at 21:55
    
Over at ObjectMentor.com there are some interesting articles, some of them might be a bit too complicated if you're just starting out. But for instance the "Single Responsibility Principle" is important when you start creating classes, see this article: objectmentor.com/resources/articles/srp.pdf –  Bakapii Aug 2 '11 at 8:15
    
Bakapii, that is an awesome link. Thank you so much! –  Mike Aug 4 '11 at 15:19
    
Happy to help, you can find some more interesting articles there, check the tag 'object oriented'. I can recommend looking at the Liskov Substitution Principle aswell, since it's quite fundamental when it comes to inheritance. –  Bakapii Aug 4 '11 at 19:31

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