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I have a file transfer code written in C using windows sockets which seems to work but keeps transferring fewer than the desired number of bytes of the file.

Any ideas?

Send code:

while(!feof(fp))
{
   bzero(bufferin,256);
   fread(bufferin,sizeof(char),255,fp);
   send(remsock,bufferin,255,0);

   if(n < 0)
      error("ERROR writing to socket");
}
send(remsock,"done",255,0);

Accept code:

while(1)
{
    recv(sockfd,buffer,255,0);
    if(compare(buffer,"done") == 0)
        break;  
    fwrite(buffer,1,255,fplog);
}
printf("File Transfer complete\n\n");
share|improve this question
    
You need to react to the return codes of all those functions you're calling. –  pyroscope Aug 1 '11 at 21:27
    
I'm not quite sure what you mean. The function called in the send code is a void return which contains the while loop above. The accept code is a while loop nested within a shell-like while loop which gets the file, and returns to accepting more requests. –  Jeremy Aug 1 '11 at 21:37
    
You should examine the return values from fread, send, recv, and fwrite. Without knowing their return values, we cannot know why your receive function isn't behaving as you expect. –  Robᵩ Aug 1 '11 at 22:32
    
looks like closing the file pointers with fclose() helped a lot but did still not completely fix it. –  Jeremy Aug 1 '11 at 22:49
1  
You must check the return value of fread/send/recv and others. If you fread less than 255 bytes (which surely will happen on the last fread of the file unless it happens to be a multiple of 255 bytes large) and only send that many bytes. Similarly when you recv() something, you might receive less than 255 bytes. Also, TCP is not message oriented, so you cannot, in any way, be assured that 1 send call will result in 1 recv call. –  nos Aug 1 '11 at 22:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As others have stated, you MUST look at the return values of all the functions you are calling, eg:

Sending:

while (!feof(fp))
{
    int nRead = fread(bufferin, sizeof(char), 256, fp);
    if (nRead <= 0)
        error("ERROR reading file");

    char *pBuf = bufferin;
    while (nRead > 0)
    {
        int nSent = send(remsock, pBuf, nRead, 0);
        if (nSent == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            if (WSAGetLastError() != WSAEWOULDBLOCK)
                error("ERROR writing to socket");

            fd_set writefd;
            FD_ZERO(&writefd);
            FD_SET(remsock, &writefd);

            if (select(0, NULL, &writefd, NULL, NULL) != 1)
                error("ERROR waiting to write to socket");

            continue;
        }

        if (nSent == 0)
            error("DISCONNECTED writing to socket");

        pBuf += nSent;
        nRead -= nSent;
    }
}

closesocket(remsock);

Receiving:

while(1)
{
    int nRecv = recv(sockfd, buffer, 256, 0);
    if (nRecv == SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        if (WSAGetLastError() != WSAEWOULDBLOCK)
            error("ERROR reading from socket");

        fd_set readfd;
        FD_ZERO(&readfd);
        FD_SET(sockfd, &readfd);

        if (select(0, &readfd, NULL, NULL, NULL) != 1)
            error("ERROR waiting for data from socket");

        continue;
    }

    if (nRecv == 0)
        break;

    char *pBuf = buffer;
    while (nRecv > 0)
    {
        int nWritten = fwrite(pBuf, sizeof(char), nRecv, fplog);
        if (nWritten <= 0)
            error("ERROR writing to file");

        pBuf += nWritten;
        nRecv -= nWritten;
    }
}

printf("File Transfer complete\n\n"); 
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, through it seems to be stuck in a loop and does not actually transfer any bytes. –  Jeremy Aug 2 '11 at 2:25
    
Did you try stepping through the code in a debugger while it is running to see what it is actually doing? –  Remy Lebeau Aug 2 '11 at 6:26
    
This looks like it should work and takes care of all the cases. I agree with using the debugger. –  Chris Cleeland Aug 2 '11 at 20:08
    
It does seem to transfer almost everything fine but the last 58 bytes on one file out of 5,626bytes, and the last 57 bytes out of a 127 byte file. It then seems to get stuck in the loop. And I am running it with ollydbg. –  Jeremy Aug 2 '11 at 23:06
    
Nevermind, code works perfect, had a little extra waiting code on the receiver side which refused to close the file correctly when the sender stopped sending data. The code given has no errors. Thanks! –  Jeremy Aug 2 '11 at 23:22

The problem is that send and recv work differently than what you may expect.

send(remsock,bufferin,255,0); /* Write MAX 255. May write less than 255. */
recv(sockfd,buffer,255,0); /* Read MAX 255. May read less than 255. */

Usually the problem lies on the receive side. So you should read in a loop.

while (bytes_to_go) {
    bytes = recv(...);
    /* Check bytes. */
    bytes_to_go -= bytes;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A loop like that will only work if you know how many bytes you're expecting. The OP's sender side gives no indication as to total size of what's being sent. Rather, the sending code simply sends the bytes 'd' 'o' 'n' 'e'. Thus, the loop must detect receipt of those bytes in order and hope that the data doesn't contain that sequence. –  Chris Cleeland Aug 2 '11 at 20:02

Take a look at sendfile() and recv()'s MSG_WAITALL.

share|improve this answer

It appears that this combination works and gives a correct checksum for the files. It is important to use fclose() at the end as well as send the correct number of bytes by capturing the return values as people said. Thanks for the responses though I did get a bit concerned when people mentioned that send and rcv functions send a max of 255 in my case of bytes and may send less. I've run many trials and have not noticed a transfer issue.

Send code:

FILE *fp;
fp = fopen("c:\\file.txt", "rb");

while(!feof(fp))
{
   bzero(buffer,256);
   n = fread(buffer,sizeof(char),255,fp);
   send(remsock,buffer,n,0);

   if(n < 0)
      error("ERROR writing to socket");
}
send(remsock,"done",255,0);
fclose(fp);

Receive code:

FILE *fp;
fp = fopen("c:\\receivedfile.txt", "wb");

while(1)
{
    n = recv(sockfd,buffer,255,0);
    if(compare(buffer,"done") == 0)
        break;  
    fwrite(buffer,1,n,fp);
}
printf("File Transfer complete\n\n");
fclose(fp);
share|improve this answer
    
just because you haven't noticed a problem doesn't mean it can't happen. the API for send and recv are what they are. The code you have above exhibits the same problems as your original post. But it also harbors an even worse issue in that it's expecting that "done" will be received (a) as a single recv and (b) that the same byte sequence won't be part of the actual data. Consider sending a preamble that contains meta-information regarding what you're transferring, or simply have the sender close the socket when it's finished sending and let the receiver read until the socket is closed. –  Chris Cleeland Aug 2 '11 at 20:06

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