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I'm returning to Java dev after many years away from it. Is there anyway to get this code to compile?

class Mpeg4
    {
    public static final int FourCC2Int(char aA, char aB, char aC, char aD)
        {
        return (aA << 24) | (aB << 16) | (aC << 8) | (aD);
        }

    public static void main(String aArgs[]) throws Exception
        {
        int x = Integer.parseInt(aArgs[0]);

        switch (x)
            {
            case Mpeg4.FourCC2Int('f', 't', 'y', 'p'): // This won't be reduced by the compiler to a constant.
                // doSomething();
                break;

            }
        }
    }

I tried also to have a class constant such as

class Mpeg4
    {
    private static final int KFtyp = Mpeg4.FourCC2Int('f', 't', 'y', 'p');

    public static void main(String aArgs[]) throws Exception
        {
        int x = Integer.parseInt(aArgs[0]);

        switch (x)
            {
            case KFtyp: // Foiled again.
                // doSomething();
                break;
            }
        }
    }

The language has changed quite a bit, and I've done Googling. Is there any way I can keep my code tidy i.e. not manually reducing the 'macro' or having a potentially massive if-then-else-if block? Maybe compiler optimisation flags might be one route? I find this situation quite lame.

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To run the program, you'll need to know the decimal value anyway (1718909306), so why not use it in your case? It just seems a little strange that you want a convenient form for the programmer when it will be very difficult for the user. –  erickson Aug 1 '11 at 22:22
    
I only wrote that above to illustrate the point. My real code parses a real file through a FileInputStream. –  James Aug 1 '11 at 22:23
    
I see; that sounds better! –  erickson Aug 1 '11 at 22:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

switch needs compile-time constant expressions (of integral or enum types, from Java 7 on also strings) for the cases, and the result of a method call is not a compile-time constant. (The compiler will not call your method.)

If you only need a single (or a low number of) case block, use an if instead.

If you have a large number, you could think about using a HashMap or such with the Command pattern. Or let some other program generate your code (e.g. if you are writing a parser).

share|improve this answer
    
Use of a map is a good suggestion. –  erickson Aug 1 '11 at 22:27
    
This might have to be the route. I was hoping to avoid having OO crud in just for the sake of it. I'm a little perplexed that javac won't do what the Hotspot compiler will end up doing anyway. –  James Aug 1 '11 at 22:44
    
If you can use Java 7, then creating a four-digit String instead of an int could help, together with the new String-switch. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 1 '11 at 22:54

You could do this

    switch (x) {
    case ('f' << 24) | ('t' << 16) | ('y' << 8) | ('p'): 
        // doSomething();
        break;
    }

Here is the JLS on what can go in a constant expression thats part of the case. Turns out its pretty flexible.

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/expressions.html#5313

share|improve this answer
    
+1 yep, this way the value is known at compile time. –  jcomeau_ictx Aug 1 '11 at 22:12
    
Also add enum literals which are valid in the case statement according to JLS –  Edwin Dalorzo Aug 1 '11 at 22:15
    
-1 completely loses semantic meaning for the check. Use enums. –  Pat Aug 1 '11 at 22:18
    
It works but it's quite messy. I'm sure the hotspot compiler will eventually generate what I want but I find it frustrating that the javac compiler won't, purely to keep my code clean. There'll be many tens of these FourCC codes. –  James Aug 1 '11 at 22:26

Nope - the value must be constant at compile time. KFtyp is constant at class load time.

Java7 has some relief for you in this regards. ( String comparison will be allowed in switches. )

However, a switch with a long series of checks against a single variable is one of the least useful constructs. Invariably, a interface with different implementors or a super class with subclasses that defines the correct behavior by construction is the better choice.

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