Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the difference between the following two SQLs:

select ...
from table1 t1
left join table2 t2 on t2.col1=t1.id and t2.col2='xxx'
where t1.col2='xxx'

select ...
from table1 t1
left join table2 t2 on t2.col1=t1.id
where t1.col2='xxx' and t2.col2='xxx'

I found when the same clause gets put at different positions the result could sometimes be different, even more the sql performance could vary dramatically. What's the major differences if I put the extra clause right after a left join or to put it after 'where'?

Can somebody offer an explanation? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Please post the difference results! The question is a bit vague and of low quality. –  Phpdna Aug 2 '11 at 4:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's rewrite SQLs:

select t1.id, t2.col1
from table1 t1
left join table2 t2 on t2.col1=t1.id and t2.col2='xxx'
where t1.col2='xxx'

select t1.id, t2.col1
from table1 t1
left join table2 t2 on t2.col1=t1.id
where t1.col2='xxx' and t2.col2='xxx'

Fill the table with data
t1 (id, col2):
1 xxx
2 xxx
3 jjj

t2 (col1, col2):
1 uuu
2 xxx
3 xxx

Result of first query:
1 NULL
2 2
Result of second query:
2 2

So, if you put any conditions in 'join', joining line may not be joined and result of join will be null.

See this link to understand

share|improve this answer
    
Thansk. However, the link doesn't seem to explain why mysql behaves differently when extra condition is put into the join clause, 'why' it returns null results? –  Shawn Aug 2 '11 at 5:18
    
One can imagine that "where" it is a global results filter. If t2.col2 != xxx, result will not contain this row. Conditions in the "left join" only affect to joining one row to another. If the terms in "left join" is not met, NULL will be joined. I hope you understand my bad English. –  vitkovskii Aug 2 '11 at 6:02

The performance could definitely vary, when mySQL is performing a select, it first starts with the whole table, and then depending on the where conditions it gets rid of some of the results, therefore you should always start your search condition with the most specific one, i.e. the one that will leave the most potential results out.

share|improve this answer

You can see the difference between the following SQLs, simply just appending "EXPLAIN" in front of both the queries. i.e.

EXPLAIN select ...
from table1 t1
left join table2 t2 on t2.col1=t1.id and t2.col2='xxx'
where t1.col2='xxx'

AND

EXPLAIN select ...
from table1 t1
left join table2 t2 on t2.col1=t1.id
where t1.col2='xxx' and t2.col2='xxx'
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.