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Let's say I have a function that looks like this:

public void saveBooking(/* some inputs */) {
    //save into database
}

Before saving into database, I have to do various validations. What I can do in my main program is like this:

//do all the validations and do any necessary handling. Then...
saveBooking(/*inputs*/);

With this, I'm sure that all the data have to pass all the validations required before saving into database. However, this means that the function saveBooking() closely depends on the validation methods. Every time I want to call saveBooking(), I have to make sure that I don't forget to call the validations.

Alternatively, I can put all the validations inside the function itself so that all I should do is to call the method and everything is taken care of. However, in order to handle all the errors independently, I have to do make the function throw exceptions and catch in the main program. It should look something like this:

public void saveBooking(/* some inputs */) /* throws various exceptions */ {
    //various validations
    //save into database
}

//...and in the main program...
try{
    saveBooking(/*inputs*/);
}
catch(MyException1 e1){
    //do something
}
catch(MyException2 e2){
    //do something
}

This also means I have to create multiple exceptions on my own. The good thing is I don't have to worry what validations I have to put before hand.

With these, I'm not sure which one is the best code design. I personally prefer the first method which is more readable but it depends on each other too much and it's getting worse when I need to use it in many places. Please advice!

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1  
Another method (for better or worse) is to return an object with any errors from saveBooking(), wherein the errors are contained in an array or object. –  Jared Farrish Aug 2 '11 at 3:45
    
@Jared I agree, and if you don't want the method to return errors because you are returning something more useful already then pass a HashMap or List in the method argument. If errors occur then you can populate this data structure and deal with them later. –  Sap Aug 2 '11 at 4:27
    
I'm not sure if it's considered a good practice to pass something as an argument just for storing something, instead of processing it. I used to do it that way before but I feel that it's kinda strange. Sometimes I end up asking myself, "eh, why do I pass that param inside the function? it doesn't seem like it's needed at all" and find out later that it's for data storing. –  Davuth Aug 2 '11 at 4:37
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Definitely the first option over the second. I consider the second to be an abuse of exceptions. Exceptions are meant for exceptional circumstances, and failing validation is not "exceptional."

Every time I want to call saveBooking(), I have to make sure that I don't forget to call the validations.

Put the validation logic into a separate method, and have saveBooking() call the validation method before it does anything else.

public List<ValidationError> validateBooking(/* args */)
{
    // as @Jared Farrish suggests, return a list of validation errors
}

public boolean saveBooking(/* args */)
{
    List<ValidationError> errors = validateBooking(/* args */);

    if (errors.size() != 0) return false; // validation failed

    // save to the database

    return true;
}
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Thanks for the response. Yes! I think this is a good way to handle it. But I have one concern. With this, I cannot handle the failed validation independently i.e. I cannot handle the failed validation inside the main program. Whether I want to output a message or something, I have to do it inside either the validation method or saveBooking(), and anything that wants to use saveBooking() has to follow whatever the handling is. –  Davuth Aug 2 '11 at 4:09
    
Not necessarily. Instead of saveBooking return a boolean you could have it return the very same List<ValidationError> that validateBooking returns, if validation failed (e.g. the list is nonempty). –  Matt Ball Aug 2 '11 at 4:11
    
Sorry, but to make matter worse, what if I need to return the object of booking when it's successful saved into database? I'm using Hibernate and it can return that object of booking after saving it. The thing is I cannot make the saveBooking() return either an object of booking or a list of error. –  Davuth Aug 2 '11 at 4:20
    
@Davuth I've implemented a solution to a problem similar to yours, though it handled only a single error rather than a list. Basically you can create a completely generic wrapper object, say a Maybe<T>, where T is whatever would be returned in the successful case. The thought is that is works something like Haskell's Maybe monad, except that if it failed, then you can retrieve additional information about the failure (in your case, the list of errors). –  Matt Ball Aug 3 '11 at 13:08
    
@Davuth here is a pretty well-explained Maybe<T> for Java: natpryce.com/articles/000776.html. Just remember yours needs an additional field and method to hold/access the list of errors. –  Matt Ball Aug 3 '11 at 13:12
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The checking should usually be carried out within the function itself so that there is no possibility of trying to save the data without first validating it. Without those checks within the function, you could find a client trying to save without validation and that's rarely a good thing.

But you're not restricted to using exceptions for this, you can simply return an error code of some sort to be checked by the caller. While I usually don't care whether errors are done by exceptions or return codes, there are some that may see this a an abuse of exceptions.

The validation code is probably still left as a separate function since your own code may wish to call it without doing the save as well. Something like (pseudo-code):

def validateStuff():
    if stuff is not valid:
        return WTF
    return OK

def saveBookings():
    rc = validateStuff()
    if rc != OK:
        return rc;
    save the information
    return OK

You'll still likely have exceptions caught by your call to saveBookings if only to handle I/O errors and the like, but it's not absolutely necessary: you could catch those exception within the function as well and translate them to a return code.

I tend to like one reporting method from each function so I (for example) don't have to try/catch and check return codes.

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In addition, your storage will most likely be a DB where you typically have further checks on validity and consistency in the schema. Some checks can also be performed much more efficiently in the DB itself. –  Carsten Aug 2 '11 at 4:02
    
Sorry, but what do you mean by "reporting method"? I never thought of returning an error code before. Talking about it, it sounds good except that we have to maintain that list of error code. Hmm... –  Davuth Aug 2 '11 at 4:14
    
@Davuth, I mean a method of reporting errors such as (1) exceptions, (2) return codes, (3) crashing badly :-) And yes, you do need to know about error codes but there's not a great deal of difference between that and knowing about a list of possible user-specified exceptions. It could be as simple as OK and BAD (true/false) or as comples as you want. –  paxdiablo Aug 2 '11 at 4:37
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You are definitely doing the right thing by validating everything before insertion, you should also validate if everything that you are inserting will fit or meets the constraints in your database to avoid an unexpected SQLException, which you won't be expecting and will go all the way to the top.

I would recommend creating a custom exception with some attributes to describe the cause of the error, this way you only have to worry about catching one kind of exception.

Aditionally I would definitly put the validation inside the method, so it is always called.

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It is not a good idea to put lot of code into one place. It is also not good idea to throw checked exceptions.

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A 3-tiered approach is fairly common in which you have the following 3 layers:

  • Client interface. This can include JavaScript validation for a web application or some basic SWT validation on GUI controls.
  • A Business layer. This layer knows the business rules. This is where you'd, typically, want to put your server-side validation. Anything that should be saved, changed, etc should be done via the business layer (this way you always have your validation and you don't care about your data store).
  • A Data layer. This layer is typically "dumb". Just save, delete, select, etc; whatever the business layer requests this layer simple does it.

This was very simplified but it gives you a decent way to separate different types of logic for easier maintenance.

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