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for(n=0;n < 20;n++){
     $('#button' + n).click(function () { newAction(n); });
}

function newAction(x){
     alert(x);
}

The problem with this code is that when I press buttons their click actions somehow are not linked to their number, so by pressing button5 i may get alert 6 or something like that.

share|improve this question
    
Is it predictable or are the alerts random ? – strager Mar 27 '09 at 17:39
    
If you could post a chunk of the HTML you're using this on, it would also help. Thanks – Mister Lucky Mar 27 '09 at 17:42

This looks weird but this would be more appropriate way to create the closure so you can access the loop-scope variable per iteration...

  for(var n = 0; n < 20; n++) {
    $('#button' + n).click((function(i) {
      return function(e) { newAction(i) }
    })(n));
  }

  function newAction(x){
    alert(x);
  }
share|improve this answer
    
this is correct. – M. Utku ALTINKAYA Mar 27 '09 at 18:10

Mr Lucky is on the right track, but his example I found a bit hard to read.

function button_bind( num ){ 
     $("#button" + num ).click(function(){
         newAction(num);
     });
}

for(var n = 0; n < 20; n++) {
     button_bind(n);
}

function newAction(x){
     alert(x);
}

This should clear up your scoping issue.

The above could be transformed to inline:

for(var n = 0; n < 20; n++) {

     (function(num){ 

        $("#button" + num ).click(function(){
         newAction(num);
        });

     })(n);

}

function newAction(x){
     alert(x);
}
share|improve this answer

Try the following:

for(n=0;n < 20;n++){
     $('#button' + n).click(function (n) { newAction(n); });
}

function newAction(x){
     alert(x);
}

The reason is closures. When you don't pass the n along with the anonymous function, javascript looks for the variable in its own scope, and the parent scope. The parent scope has an 'n', but this n is the value of the n after the for loop. By passing along the n, you create a new n inside the scope of the function, and this one isn't changed when the for loop runs.

share|improve this answer
    
jQuery sends the first argument of click(function(e) {...}); That would be the event object, not his userdefined variable. – Mister Lucky Mar 27 '09 at 17:47

i can think of easier ways to do what you are trying, but this'll work for you:

EDIT: Sorry i thought it was clear i was supplying a replacement for the line inside your loop. Here the entire functioning program

EDIT 2: Okay here's the outer $(document).ready() wrapper also that isn't even in the original question. This has been tested. this works. Even on 1.3+ .. It's the best answer given.

I've put up a functioning version of this program you can try out by visiting here

$(function() {
  for (n = 0; n < 20; n++){
    $('#button' + n).bind('click', n, function (e) { newAction(e.data); });
  }

});

function newAction(x){
  alert(x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are you missing something? This does not work for me using the 1.3x jQuery? – Mister Lucky Mar 27 '09 at 18:00
    
Even your edit would not work, the jQuery docs say you can pass the data that way. But it's not working if you wire this up in a real page and try it. – Mister Lucky Mar 27 '09 at 18:18
    
like i said in the edit, I thot it was obvious the one line i supplied went inside the FOR loop. The answer i've given works fine with 1.3.2. Dont quite understand the downvotes, since I think it's the best answer on this page so far – Scott Evernden Mar 27 '09 at 18:19
    
i wired up a real page and i really tried it and it really works. I assume you understand this all goes inside a $(document).ready() which even the original post didn't have? – Scott Evernden Mar 27 '09 at 18:21
    
you should use jQuery(function($){ }); to maximise effectiveness. Voted up because the 3-arg-bind does work, as per documented. – Kent Fredric Mar 27 '09 at 19:14

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