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In short the brewer's CAP theorem states that any database is either CA,CP or AP

Why do people consider Redis as a CP database?

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closed as off topic by Mitch Wheat, Nicholas Knight, Sanjay T. Sharma, Residuum, John Saunders Aug 3 '11 at 18:35

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Can you point us to the source of the claim that it's considered as CP? –  yojimbo87 Aug 2 '11 at 7:45
    
    
It's giving me access denied :( –  yojimbo87 Aug 2 '11 at 8:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

@seppoo0010 is correct. It is more meaningful to speak of a Redis node in terms of Atomicity, Durability, etc.

Also note that CAP is a somewhat problematic paradigm. I second Dr. Brewer's recommendation of Coda Hale's informative rant. (See also comments by Daniel Abdi). Also note Jeff Darcy and Dan Weinreb's comments.

Stonebraker disagrees.

[Edit: Dan Weinreb's deep digging of CAP really is quite excellent. Highly recommended]

Finally, here is "the proof" of CAP.

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The CAP Theorem refers to distributed computer systems.

Since Redis is not per se distributed (clustering is under development) being CP/CA/PA depends on the clustering implementation.

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Can u explain in short how to implement CP distributed reids? –  ciochPep Aug 2 '11 at 15:44
    
Not really. If interested, read aosabook.org/en/nosql.html specially 13.4 and 13.5. –  seppo0010 Aug 2 '11 at 17:41

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