Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the query 'SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE a = x AND b = y OR c = z', how does it parse this query?

(a = x AND b = y) OR c = z?
a = x AND (b = y OR c = z)?

That is a simple example, but what about if you're mixing and matching AND / OR with even more search terms?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

(a = x AND b = y) OR c = z

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/operator-precedence.html

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but what if you have something like a = b AND c = d OR e = f OR g = h AND i = j Does it just wrap parens around the 'AND' statements? –  Matthew Mar 27 '09 at 17:50
    
Pretty much: (a = b AND c = d) OR e = f OR (g = h AND i = j) –  user83591 Mar 27 '09 at 17:52
add comment

As already answered, AND would have precedence and be parsed first.

I think the answer you're really looking for here is: don't write a query like SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE a = x AND b = y OR c = z.

If what you mean is SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE ((a = x AND b = y) OR c = z) or you meant to have SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE (a = x AND (b = y OR c = z)) then write it that way from the beginning.

It will save you having to figure it out when you look at the query again next week (or month, or year) and it will make things easier on future maintainers as well.

share|improve this answer
add comment

AND is higher precedence.

share|improve this answer
add comment

from the MySQL manual section 11.2.1. Operator Precedence: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/operator-precedence.html

AND has precedence over OR. (a = x AND b = y) OR c = z is the equivalent expression.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.