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I have a Whoosh (file indexer) writer object

>>> a
<whoosh.filedb.filewriting.SegmentWriter object at 0x013DFE10>

As whoosh doesnt allow mutiple writers and implement thread safety (AFAIK!!), I would like to close that object when it has been used.

>>> a.is_closed
False

But it has no close method. I was assured that all mature python library objects have internal functions such as __ exit__ that allow all basic functionality. What is the right way of closing a Python object? Or does it depend on the library itself? I take the "a single but obvious way to do it right" way of Python in it's literal form

Here's the paste of dir(a): http://pastebin.com/Q5hceTr8


Postscript

I just learned about the with statement just a day before by asking on Confused about Python's with statement . This question is distinct because I needed a way to handle a global object; so that I can do a commit after multiple additions or deletions. Seems like whoosh has a searcher.close() but not an indexer.close(), which seems inconsistent

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If it has __enter__ and __exit__ methods, that means it implements the context manager protocol, and you should use it like this:

with constructor(args) as a:
    # do stuff with a
    pass
# here a is closed even if you had an error above

Where constructor is either the class itself or whatever factory function you use to create it. In Python 2.5 you need to from __future__ import with_statement.

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I was assured that all mature python library objects have internal functions such as __ exit__ that allow all basic functionality.

They do, and your pastebin indicates such - see __exit__ at the top?

This is a special method used to implement the following...

What is the right way of closing a Python object?

Automatically, using a with-block:

with some_api_call() as awesome_thing_from_api:
    use(awesome_thing_from_api)
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wish I could have accepted two answers –  aitchnyu Aug 2 '11 at 6:49
    
haha someone one else who names and thinks about programming nomenclature like i –  Matt Joiner Aug 2 '11 at 7:13

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