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I wish to set an NSError pointer from within a block in a project using automatic reference counting. What follows is a simplified version of my code:

- (BOOL)frobnicateReturningError:(NSError **)error
{
    NSArray *items = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"One", @"Two", @"Three", nil];

    __block Frobnicator *blockSelf = self;
    [items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id item, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        [blockSelf doSomethingWithItem:item error:error];
    }];
}

This compiles but given error may be modified by doSomethingWithItem I tried creating a local NSError for the block to modify, which would then be used to set the original error after the enumeration (which I haven't shown):

- (BOOL)frobnicateReturningError:(NSError **)error
{
    NSArray *items = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"One", @"Two", @"Three", nil];

    __block Frobnicator *blockSelf = self;
    __block NSError *blockError = nil;
    [items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id item, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        [blockSelf doSomethingWithItem:item error:&blockError];
    }];
}

This fails to compile with the following error:

passing address of non-local object to __autoreleasing parameter for write-back

Googling for this error only returns results from the Clang source code itself.

One solution that seems to work but is a bit ugly is to have an inner and outer error pointer:

- (BOOL)frobnicateReturningError:(NSError **)error
{
    NSArray *items = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"One", @"Two", @"Three", nil];

    __block Frobnicator *blockSelf = self;
    __block NSError *outerError = nil;
    [items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id item, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        NSError *innerError = nil;
        [blockSelf doSomethingWithItem:item error:&innerError];
        outerError = innerError;
    }];
}

What is the correct way to set an NSError from within a block?

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@jtbandes: I don't think it's necessary to create an [objc-arc] tag when we already have both [objective-c] and [automatic-ref-counting] together... –  BoltClock Aug 4 '11 at 11:40
    
I suggest you post on devforums.apple.com - some Apple folk will most likely respond to help you –  Mike Weller Aug 4 '11 at 11:52
    
@BoltClock: my goal was to eventually make [objc-arc] a synonym. Perhaps that was the wrong way to go about it, sorry. –  jtbandes Aug 4 '11 at 15:35
    
@Mike Weller: Why? I don't see anything under NDA here, ARC is already public. –  BoltClock Aug 4 '11 at 17:14
    
I just mean lots of Apple folk are on the official forums answering ARC questions just like these. –  Mike Weller Aug 9 '11 at 12:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

// ...
__block NSError *blockError = nil;
[items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id item, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    NSError *localError = nil;
    if (![blockSelf doSomethingWithItem:item error:&localError]) {
        blockError = localError;
    }
}];
// ...

As for exactly why this is necessary, I'm still trying to get a grasp on that myself. I'll update this answer when I do. :)

share|improve this answer
2  
In essence, when you create a __block variable, the compiler emits code to make a heap-allocated copy of that variable at runtime, which is then shared between the calling scope and the block. It then rewrites all references to those variables to access that memory instead. That's how __block variables can 'outlive' their original scopes. Once you know that's hapenning, it's easy to see why compile-time address-of operations against the original stack variables are not going to affect the heap-allocated copy. That's slightly over-simplifying it, but is the crux of why this is necessary. –  ipmcc Oct 18 '11 at 12:43
    
The localError isn't necessary. You can pass &blockError directly as long as it has the __block keyword. –  Steve Oct 30 '12 at 22:06

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