Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's what I've written:

public class JavaApplication4 {
    private RunMode runMode;

    private enum RunMode {
        STOP, START, SCE, SIE;

        void reset() {
            this = STOP; // <=== 'cannot assign a value to final variable this.'
        }
    }

}

As noted, the assignment to 'this' is flagged. Why is 'this' final, and how can I change the value of an enum variable with an enum instance method?

share|improve this question
1  
why do you want to do that - that is the purpose –  Petar Ivanov Aug 2 '11 at 6:43
    
I did not grasp the fact that each value of an enum is a constant, "pre-instantiated" object, independent of whether a reference to it has been assigned to a variable. I guess I was confusing the variable (which I wanted to change) with the constant object to which it currently referred. In retrospect, all I really wanted was for my RunMode enum definition to include a specification of the "default" RunMode; namely, STOP. –  Chap Aug 2 '11 at 8:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It really doesnt make sense to reassign an already instantiated Enum. Think of Enums as singleton objects. In your case, START, STOP, SCE and SIE are all singleton objects that are pre-instantiated. All you do is pass around their reference in your application.

share|improve this answer
2  
All answers helped, but this one really got to the heart of my misunderstanding. Enum values are pre-instantiated, constant, singleton objects. When I set foo=RunType.STOP, and then want to change foo, I must assign something else to foo, not change the constant that foo is currently bound to! –  Chap Aug 2 '11 at 7:53

The enum exists to provide you with a set of related constants that are used to describe some state (in your case, the run mode of the application). The instances are immutable, for good reason: they are supposed to represent constants.

You don't really want to "reset" the object that represents a run mode. You want to reset the run mode of the application. So the functionality belongs in the application class, and it is implemented by assigning a different enum object to the field.

public class JavaApplication4 {
    private RunMode runMode;

    public void reset() {
        runMode = RunMode.STOP;
    }

    private enum RunMode {
        STOP, START, SCE, SIE;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I was just coming to :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 8:39

You can never change the value of an enum from one to another. Enums are meant to be constants. It sounds like you should probably return STOP from the reset() method (and any other potentially-state-changing methods) and write:

runMode = runMode.reset(); // etc

It's important to understand that enums are reference types, and meant to effectively be a collection of constant values. Not only can you not mutate one value into another, but you shouldn't change the value of any fields within the enum either (unless it's for caching).

share|improve this answer
    
To avoid confusion, let's call the variable 'rm'. Would it be rm = rm.reset(), or rm = RunMode.reset()? I guess both would work, but both seem overly wordy. I'd wanted to be able to write rm.reset() but I guess I can't, if rm is simply an enum type. –  Chap Aug 2 '11 at 8:25
    
@Chap: It sounds like you may want a mutable type around your RunMode - as per Karl's answer. –  Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 8:39
    
Quite so. Altogether an enlightening discussion! –  Chap Aug 2 '11 at 19:49

Enums are just a bunch of constants grouped together under one type.

Is that what you want:

private RunMode runMode;

private enum RunMode {
    STOP, START, SCE, SIE;
}

void reset() {
    runMode = RunMode.STOP;
}
share|improve this answer

this is not a modifiable entity. Easiest way is to move your reset() inside the class body itself:

public class JavaApplication4 {
    private RunMode runmode;

    private enum RunMode {
        STOP, START, SCE, SIE;
    }
    void reset() {  // <---- move it here
        runMode = RunMode.STOP; // <=== ok
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.