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I have an application where I want all my model classes to implement a specific update method. For this I created an abstract class and an interface with the following declaration:

public interface BaseInterface<T>
{
    T update(T t);
}

public abstract class BaseClass<T extends BaseClass<T>> implements BaseInterface<T>
{

}

Hence all my model classes will extend BaseClass. For example a Book class definition will be

public class Book extends BaseClass<Book>
{
    public Book update(Book b)
    {
        //implementation
    }
}

However using the above construct I am not able to restrict declarations of my model classes. For example while it is valid and required for the Book class to extend BaseClass<Book>, the following declaration also valid:

class Book extends BaseClass<User>
{
    public User update(User u)
    {
        //implementation
    }
}

While it is syntactically correct to do the above I want to restrict that.

Basically I want my model classes' update method to take as parameter an instance of its own class and return an instance of its own class and nothing else.

In other words, if there is a class C that extends BaseClass, then its update method must be of the exact signature C update(C c).

Or in other words if there is a class C that extends BaseClass, then the template parameter for BaseClass must be C itself [ie C extends BaseClass<C>] and nothing else.

How do I achieve that?

NOTE: This is somewhat similar to the enum declaration

public class Enum<E extends Enum<E>> implements Comparable<E>
{
    int compareTo(E e)
    {
    }
}

Here we are able to restrict the definition of compareTo method to take an instance of its own type of enum and not any other kind of enum.

Thanks in advance.

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1  
Please for the love of god please don't create an interface called BaseInterface, you might as well call it Zywbxzytdkkenbfd. It should be called Updateable. –  Qwerky Aug 2 '11 at 8:35
    
I named the interface BaseInterface to make my question clear. Not that I will use it in production. –  Swaranga Sarma Aug 2 '11 at 10:02

1 Answer 1

Change definition of you interface to interface BaseInterface<T extends BaseClass<T>>.

Please follow my example:

public interface BaseInterface<T extends BaseClass<T>> {
    T update(T t);
}

public abstract class BaseClass<T extends BaseClass<T>> implements
        BaseInterface<T> {

}

public class Book extends BaseClass<Book> {
    @Override
    public Book update(Book b) {
        return null;
    }
}

class User {}

    // This code cannot be compiled exactly for reason you want.
public class Book2 extends BaseClass<User> {
    @Override
    public Book2 update(Book2 b) {
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think, the above code does quite what I want. The coder for Book2 can easily refactor the update method to User update(User u) and the code compiles. What I want is that if there is a class C, then its update method must be C update(C c) –  Swaranga Sarma Aug 2 '11 at 7:22
    
Try it as I did. The code cannot be compiled anywayt because class User does not meet requirement: it does not extend BaseClass. So, the compilation error appears in the class header. –  AlexR Aug 2 '11 at 8:33
    
@Swaranga Sarma: You can enforce that a subclass defines a specific method. But you cannot prevent the subclass from defining overloaded versions of this method. –  Grodriguez Aug 2 '11 at 9:07
    
@Alex...but if User extends BaseClass, it compiles. –  Swaranga Sarma Aug 2 '11 at 10:01

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