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CString strFile = "c:\\test.txt";

CStdioFile aFile;

UINT nOpenFlags = CFile::modeWrite | CFile::modeCreate | CFile::typeText;

CFileException anError;

if (!aFile.Open(strFile, nOpenFlags, &anError))
{
    return false
}

int nSize = 4*sizeof(double);
double* pData = new double[2];

CString strLine, str;

// Write begin of header
strLine = _T(">>> Begin of header <<<\n");
aFile.WriteString(strLine);

// Retrieve current position of file pointer
int lFilePos = (long) aFile.GetPosition();

// Close file
aFile.Close();

nOpenFlags = CFile::modeWrite | CFile::typeBinary;

if (!aFile.Open(strFile, nOpenFlags, &anError))
{
    return false;
}

for(int i = 0 ; i < 2 ; i++)
{
    pData[i] = i;     
}

// Set position of file pointer behind header
aFile.Seek(lFilePos, CFile::begin);

// Write complex vector
aFile.Write(pData, nSize);

// Write complex vector
aFile.Write(pData, nSize);

// Close file
aFile.Close();

Intention to create a file which contains both text data and binary data. This code is written in MFC. I wanted to similarly created a file in C# which contains both text data a and binary data. Please let me know which stream class is used to create this

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Is UNICODE defined at compile time? –  Benoit Aug 2 '11 at 7:29
    
no, it is not defined –  Raghaav Aug 2 '11 at 7:31

2 Answers 2

Text can be written as binary data => simply use binary mode for the whole file and be done.

The only thing the text mode does is that it converts "\n" to "\r\n" on write and back on read. Since the file is partly binary and therefore not editable in regular text editor anyway, you don't need that conversion. If the file is just for your application, you just don't care and if it's for another application, just use whatever newline sequence it requires manually.

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if i use the binary mode for the entire file. Does the text data appears in the readable format? –  Raghaav Aug 2 '11 at 7:49
    
@Raghaav: Yes, if you want it to. That's the easiest to implement, e.g. length-prefixed. –  Kerrek SB Aug 2 '11 at 7:55
    
sorry to ask this what is this length-prefixed. –  Raghaav Aug 2 '11 at 7:57
    
FileStream aaFileStream = new FileStream(@"c:\\welcometostream.rda", FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None); BinaryWriter aBinaryWriter = new BinaryWriter(aaFileStream); aBinaryWriter.Write(string.Format("PatientName:{0}", "RajeevVerma")); aBinaryWriter.Close(); Console.Read(); –  Raghaav Aug 2 '11 at 7:58
    
Please refer the attached code. I am getting some strange result –  Raghaav Aug 2 '11 at 7:59

As to C#, possibly this S.O. article can give you the answer you are looking for.

The C# solution could also guide you in writing something similar for c, but I suspect you are on your own, i.e., you can use generic read/write to file. In C++, you have the possibility of doing formatted input/output from/to streams by using operator>> and operator<<.

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FileStream aaFileStream = new FileStream(@"c:\\welcometostream.rda", FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None); BinaryWriter aBinaryWriter = new BinaryWriter(aaFileStream); aBinaryWriter.Write(string.Format("PatientName:{0}", "RajeevVerma")); aBinaryWriter.Close(); Console.Read(); output is PatientName:RajeevVerma why strange character is inserted. The string which are entering into the file should be read –  Raghaav Aug 2 '11 at 7:54

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