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What is this PHP code means ?

is_array($data) OR $data = (array) $data

I see this code on PyroCMS

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

OR is a short-circuit operator. If the left side is true, the right side will not be evaluated. It basically says "if $data is not an array, cast it to an array".

Note that this is rather redundant and could be abbreviated to:

$data = (array)$data;

This has the same effect. If it already is an array, casting to an array will do nothing, otherwise it will cast to an array.

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It also ensures that the array $data exists (as does your version, but I feel it is worth mentioning). –  vascowhite Aug 2 '11 at 7:34
    
@vascowhite Yes, but it's the wrong way to ensure that, since PHP will throw two notices if the variables doesn't exist. –  deceze Aug 2 '11 at 7:37
    
thanks for mentioning "short circuit" keyword. that is very helpful. I really don't know that it can be done on PHP –  Permana Aug 2 '11 at 7:38
    
@deceze definately the wrong way, your code is correct, I just thought it should be pointed out for completeness. –  vascowhite Aug 2 '11 at 7:40

It tests if $data is an array, and casts it to one if it isn't.

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It is equal to:

if (!is_array($data)) $data = (array) $data
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That code type casts $data to an array, if it's not an array.

More information on type casting - http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.type-juggling.php

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It's a (terrible in my opinion) hackish way of writing:

if(!is_array($data)) {
    $data = (array) $data;
}

Which is basically forcing the $data variable to be an array.

Don't write code like this. It's hard to process (mentally), and doesn't save any time. :-)

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