Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Scala I can enforce type equality at compile time. For example:

case class Foo[A,B]( a: A, b: B )( implicit ev: A =:= B )

scala> Foo( 1, 2 )
res3: Foo[Int,Int] = Foo(1,2)

scala> Foo( 1, "2" )
<console>:10: error: Cannot prove that Int =:= java.lang.String.

Is there a way to enforce that type A and type B should be different ?

share|improve this question
2  
Nice one… But does it have useful applications? Sounds like something like Miles Sabin's magical typesystem tricks could maybe be of use. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Aug 2 '11 at 8:47
    
@Jean-Phillipe_Pellet: I would like to make a bidirectional map of types [A,B], when I call apply with A, it returns a B, and when I call apply with B it returns an A. I don't know if it will be possible, but at least I need to different types. –  paradigmatic Aug 2 '11 at 8:49
    
I see. Mightn't you want to name the two accessor methods differently then, to allow for the same type parameters? –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Aug 2 '11 at 8:52
    
That would be plan B, if I cannot find a way to implement the fist idea. –  paradigmatic Aug 2 '11 at 8:55
6  
Interesting. I thought that something along the lines of implicit def t[N, A >: N, B >: N]()(implicit n: N =:= Nothing) = new =/=[A,B] would work (expressing "if the closest common subtype of A and B is Nothing, they are different"), but it doesn't... –  Landei Aug 2 '11 at 9:44
add comment

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Riffing off of Jean-Philippe's ideas, this works:

sealed class =!=[A,B]

trait LowerPriorityImplicits {
  implicit def equal[A]: =!=[A, A] = sys.error("should not be called")
}
object =!= extends LowerPriorityImplicits {
  implicit def nequal[A,B](implicit same: A =:= B = null): =!=[A,B] = 
    if (same != null) sys.error("should not be called explicitly with same type")
    else new =!=[A,B]
}     

case class Foo[A,B](a: A, b: B)(implicit e: A =!= B)

Then:

// compiles:
Foo(1f, 1.0)
Foo("", 1.0)
Foo("", 1)
Foo("Fish", Some("Fish"))

// doesn't compile
// Foo(1f, 1f)
// Foo("", "")

I'd probably simplify this as follows, since the checks for "cheating" can always be circumvented anyway (e.g. Foo(1, 1)(null) or =!=.nequal(null)):

sealed class =!=[A,B]

trait LowerPriorityImplicits {
  /** do not call explicitly! */
  implicit def equal[A]: =!=[A, A] = sys.error("should not be called")
}
object =!= extends LowerPriorityImplicits {
  /** do not call explicitly! */
  implicit def nequal[A,B]: =!=[A,B] = new =!=[A,B]
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I've found something similar in a blog comment, but unfortunately, the check happens at runtime not at compilation. –  paradigmatic Aug 3 '11 at 16:48
    
@paradigmatic I'm not sure whether I'm interpreting your comment correctly.... In my code the check happens at compile-time -- did you mean that the blog comment demonstrates a runtime check? –  Aaron Novstrup Aug 3 '11 at 17:11
    
My bad. Your solution works perfectly ! I've understood the difference with what I've seen. I checked it with subtypes and it also works well. –  paradigmatic Aug 3 '11 at 17:23
1  
@paradigmatic Updated with a simpler version that eliminates the "cheating" checks. As explained in the answer, those checks can always be circumvented anyway. –  Aaron Novstrup Aug 3 '11 at 17:45
    
@Aaron Nice simplification. You could declare sealed class =!=[A,B] extends NotNull to prevent nasty users from manually passing null. Similarly, we could have a NotNull subclass of =:= to enforce the cheating check in your first version. The last thing we cannot prevent is a manual call to equal –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Aug 4 '11 at 8:18
show 9 more comments

I have a simpler solution, which also leverages ambiguity,

trait =!=[A, B]

implicit def neq[A, B] : A =!= B = null

// This pair excludes the A =:= B case
implicit def neqAmbig1[A] : A =!= A = null
implicit def neqAmbig2[A] : A =!= A = null

The original use case,

case class Foo[A,B](a : A, b : B)(implicit ev: A =!= B)
new Foo(1, "1")
new Foo("foo", Some("foo"))

// These don't compile
// new Foo(1, 1)
// new Foo("foo", "foo")
// new Foo(Some("foo"), Some("foo"))

Update

We can relate this to my "magical typesystem tricks" (thanks @jpp ;-) as follows,

type ¬[T] = T => Nothing
implicit def neg[T, U](t : T)(implicit ev : T =!= U) : ¬[U] = null

def notString[T <% ¬[String]](t : T) = t

Sample REPL session,

scala> val ns1 = notString(1)
ns1: Int = 1

scala> val ns2 = notString(1.0)
ns2: Double = 1.0

scala> val ns3 = notString(Some("foo"))
ns3: Some[java.lang.String] = Some(foo)

scala> val ns4 = notString("foo")
<console>:14: error: No implicit view available from 
  java.lang.String => (String) => Nothing.
       val ns4 = notString2("foo")
                            ^
share|improve this answer
    
I really like your update. Great job. –  paradigmatic Aug 8 '11 at 13:22
1  
Nice! It's probably worth pointing out that, as with the other answers, this implements negation-as-failure: notString("foo": AnyRef) compiles. –  Aaron Novstrup Aug 17 '11 at 17:51
    
@Aaron this technique, and indeed the question, only makes sense in a static context. Otherwise there'd be no other option than to do dynamic runtime type tests. –  Miles Sabin Aug 18 '11 at 14:16
    
@Miles I wondered if there was a way to statically enforce a stronger notion of inequality, where the static constraint indicates that any two instances of the types have different runtime types. For example, String and Int are unequal in this sense, while String and AnyRef are not. String with Int would seem to be a contradiction, but, if my understanding is correct, it's not instantiable. –  Aaron Novstrup Aug 18 '11 at 14:49
2  
@Miles Suppose I want to define =!= so that A =!= B if and only if every non-null instance of A is not an instance of B and every non-null instance of B is not an instance of A. By this definition, String =!= Int. My intuition is that the compiler has the information to enforce the constraint, but that it's not expressible in Scala. –  Aaron Novstrup Aug 19 '11 at 20:49
show 4 more comments

Based on Landei's idea, the following seems to work:

case class Foo[A, B <: A, C <: A]( a: B, b: C)(implicit f: AnyVal <:< A)

scala> Foo(1f, 1.0)
res75: Foo[AnyVal,Float,Double] = Foo(1.0,1.0)

scala> Foo("", 1.0)
res76: Foo[Any,java.lang.String,Double] = Foo(,1.0)

scala> Foo(1f, 1f)
<console>:10: error: Cannot prove that AnyVal <:< Float.
       Foo(1f, 1f)
          ^

scala> Foo("", "")
<console>:10: error: Cannot prove that AnyVal <:< java.lang.String.
       Foo("", "")
          ^

scala> Foo("", 1)
res79: Foo[Any,java.lang.String,Int] = Foo(,1)
share|improve this answer
    
Nice trick! But this only works for primitive types, and only because the hierarchy is flat there. This does not work: Foo("Fish",Some("Fish")). –  Rex Kerr Aug 2 '11 at 16:39
add comment

Here's another attempt:

class =!=[A, B] private () extends NotNull

object =!= {
  implicit def notMeantToBeCalled1[A, B >: A, C >: B <: A]: =!=[B, A] = error("should not be called")
  implicit def notMeantToBeCalled2[A, B >: A, C >: B <: A]: =!=[B, A] = error("should not be called")
  implicit def unambigouslyDifferent[A, B](implicit same: A =:= B = null): =!=[A, B] =
    if (same != null) error("should not be called explicitly with the same type")
    else new =!=
}

case class Foo[A, B](a: A, b: B)(implicit ev: A =!= B)

Then, again:

// compiles:
Foo(1f, 1.0)
Foo("", 1.0)
Foo("", 1)
Foo("Fish", Some("Fish"))

// doesn't compile
// Foo(1f, 1f)
// Foo("", "")

Like in my other proposal, the aim here is to introduce a compile-time ambiguity when A and B are the same. Here, we provide two implicits for the case where A is the same as B, and an unambiguous implicit when this is not the case.

Note that the problem is that you could still explicitly provide the implicit parameter by manually calling =!=.notMeantToBeCalled1 or =!=.unambigouslyDifferent. I couldn't think of a way to prevent this at compile time. However, we can throw an exception at runtime, with the trick that unambigouslyDifferent requires an evidence parameter itself indicating whether A is the same as B. But wait... Aren't we trying to prove the exact opposite? Yes, and that's why that same implicit parameter has a default value of null. And we expect it to be null for all legal uses — the only time where it would not be null is when a nasty user calls e.g. Foo(1f, 1f)(=:=.unambiguouslyDifferent[Float, Float]), and there we can prevent this cheating by throwing an exception.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure the cheating checks are worth the additional complexity -- especially since the nasty user can still call =!=.unambiguoslyDifferent[Float, Float](null), or, since =!= is just a phantom type, Foo(1, 1)(null). It would be nice if Scala had some way to express that an implicit method can not be called explicitly. –  Aaron Novstrup Aug 3 '11 at 17:38
add comment

I liked the simplicity and effectiveness of Miles Sabin's first solution, but was a bit dissatisfied with the fact that the error we get is not very helpful:

By example with the following definition:

def f[T]( implicit e: T =!= String ) {}

Attemtping to do f[String] will fail to compile with:

<console>:10: error: ambiguous implicit values:
 both method neqAmbig1 in object =!= of type [A]=> =!=[A,A]
 and method neqAmbig2 in object =!= of type [A]=> =!=[A,A]
 match expected type =!=[String,String]
              f[String]
               ^

I'd rather have the compiler tell me something along the line of "T is not different from String" It turns out that it's quite easy if add yet another level of implicits in such a way that we turn the ambiguity error into an implicit not found error. From then we can use the implicitNotFound annotation to emit a custom error message:

@annotation.implicitNotFound(msg = "Cannot prove that ${A} =!= ${B}.")
trait =!=[A,B]
object =!= {
  class Impl[A, B]
  object Impl {
    implicit def neq[A, B] : A Impl B = null
    implicit def neqAmbig1[A] : A Impl A = null
    implicit def neqAmbig2[A] : A Impl A = null
  }

  implicit def foo[A,B]( implicit e: A Impl B ): A =!= B = null
}

Now let's try to call f[String]:

scala> f[String]
<console>:10: error: Cannot prove that String =!= String.
              f[String]
           ^

That's better. Thanks compiler.

As a last trick for those that like the context bound syntactic sugar, one can define this alias (based on type lambdas):

type IsNot[A] = { type λ[B] = A =!= B }

Then we can define f like this:

def f[T:IsNot[String]#λ] {}

Whether it is easier to read is highly subjective. In any case is definitly shorter than writing the full implicit parameter list.

UPDATE: For completeness, here the equivalent code for expressing that A is is not a sub-type of B:

@annotation.implicitNotFound(msg = "Cannot prove that ${A} <:!< ${B}.")
trait <:!<[A,B]
object <:!< {
  class Impl[A, B]
  object Impl {
    implicit def nsub[A, B] : A Impl B = null
    implicit def nsubAmbig1[A, B>:A] : A Impl B = null
    implicit def nsubAmbig2[A, B>:A] : A Impl B = null
  }

  implicit def foo[A,B]( implicit e: A Impl B ): A <:!< B = null
}

type IsNotSub[B] = { type λ[A] = A <:!< B }

And for expressing that A is not convertible to B :

@annotation.implicitNotFound(msg = "Cannot prove that ${A} <%!< ${B}.")
trait <%!<[A,B]
object <%!< {
  class Impl[A, B]
  object Impl {
    implicit def nconv[A, B] : A Impl B = null
    implicit def nconvAmbig1[A<%B, B] : A Impl B = null
    implicit def nconvAmbig2[A<%B, B] : A Impl B = null
  }

  implicit def foo[A,B]( implicit e: A Impl B ): A <%!< B = null
}

type IsNotView[B] = { type λ[A] = A <%!< B }
share|improve this answer
add comment

How about something like this, then?

class Foo[A, B] private (a: A, b: B)

object Foo {
  def apply[A, B <: A, C >: A <: B](a: A, b: B)(implicit nothing: Nothing) = nothing
  def apply[A, B >: A, C >: B <: A](a: A, b: B)(implicit nothing: Nothing, dummy: DummyImplicit) = nothing
  def apply[A, B](a: A, b: B): Foo[A, B] = new Foo(a, b)
}

Then:

// compiles:
Foo(1f, 1.0)
Foo("", 1.0)
Foo("", 1)
Foo("Fish", Some("Fish"))

// doesn't compile
// Foo(1f, 1f)
// Foo("", "")

The idea is to make resolution ambiguous when Ais the same as B, and unambiguous when they are not the same. To further emphasize that the ambiguous methods should not be called, I added an implicit of type Nothing, which should never be around (and should certainly look wrong to the caller if they try to insert one explicitly). (The role of the DummyImplicit is just to give a different signature to the first two methods.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is not an answer, just the beginnings of what I could think is an answer. The code below will return either an Yes or an No depending on whether the types are equal or not, if you ask for implicitly[AreEqual[A,B]]. How to go from there to actually making a check I haven't been able to figure out. Maybe the whole approach is doomed, maybe someone can make something out of it. Mind you, implicitly[No[A, B]] will always return something, one can't use that. :-(

class AreEqual[A, B]
trait LowerPriorityImplicits {
  implicit def toNo[A : Manifest, B : Manifest]: No[A, B] = No[A, B]
}
object AreEqual extends LowerPriorityImplicits {
  implicit def toYes[A, B](implicit ev: A =:= B, m1: Manifest[A], m2: Manifest[B]): Yes[A, B] = Yes[A, B]
}

case class Yes[A : Manifest, B : Manifest]() extends AreEqual[A, B] {
  override def toString: String = "Yes(%s, %s)" format (manifest[A].toString, manifest[B].toString)
}
case class No[A : Manifest, B : Manifest]() extends AreEqual[A, B] {
  override def toString: String = "No(%s, %s)" format (manifest[A].toString, manifest[B].toString)
}

Test:

scala> implicitly[AreEqual[String, Option[String]]]
res0: AreEqual[String,Option[String]] = No(java.lang.String, scala.Option[java.lang.String])

scala> implicitly[AreEqual[String, String]]
res1: AreEqual[String,String] = Yes(java.lang.String, java.lang.String)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.