Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following function:

 char *f()
 {   
 char *s=malloc(8);
 }
 main()
 {
  printf("%c",*f()='A');
 }

If I comment the line char *s=malloc(8); I get an error as if the assignment *f()='A' accessed invalid memory. Since I never return any variable why does above assignment work at all?

2nd question: 'A' is assigned to temporary variable created on return of function . So why can't ++a etc. be used as lvalue?

share|improve this question
    
Which compiler are you using? Please post the exact error message. –  Björn Pollex Aug 2 '11 at 9:37
1  
Isn't there any warnings when you compile this code ? For example, that there is no return in f ? –  Clement Bellot Aug 2 '11 at 9:37
2  
just because you observe something to be working it doesn't mean it it works at all. int min(int a, int b) { return a; } this function works on average 50% of the time. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 2 '11 at 9:39
    
"Why does [it] work at all?" Because your compiler's warnings aren't high enough and/or you're extremely unlucky. –  Chris Lutz Aug 2 '11 at 9:41
    
I use codeblocks. I know it is bad code .No warnings.So u mean in absence of return statement function returns a random address.What about 2nd question? –  sunny Aug 2 '11 at 9:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming return values are passed in registers, the return value from malloc might still be there when returning from f(). By pure chance.

When assigning to *f() you are not assigning to a temporary but to the memory returned from malloc. Assigning to ++a is totally different.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for actually answering the question. –  Chris Lutz Aug 2 '11 at 9:46
    
Although I miss they key phrase here - undefined behavior. –  Björn Pollex Aug 2 '11 at 9:49
    
The question was why it seemed to work. Not if was correct. –  Bo Persson Aug 2 '11 at 9:51
    
I think the question is when and why you can assign to lvalues. –  duedl0r Aug 2 '11 at 9:53

Your function does not return anything. Since you declare the function with the return-type char *, not returning anything results in undefined behavior, as defined in paragraph 6.6.3.2 of the current C++ Standard:

Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function.

Undefined behavior means that anything can happen. To fix that problem, your function should look like this:

char *f()
{   
    return malloc(8);
}
share|improve this answer

1/ The return of f() is an uninitialized pointer, but exists.
*f() return the value pointed by an unspecified (random) address.
Writing at this address is an invalid memory access, or maybe not if this address is by "chance" a writable piece of memory (stack or previously allocated heap).
In C, it is your responsibility to ensure that you properly access the memory.

2/ 'A' is not assigned here to a temporary.

share|improve this answer

Your function f() is not returning anything, you need to add:

return s;

But, in all honesty, this is just going to be the start of your problems. You also need to free() the return value of f().

I do not know why you have tagged this question C++, this is clearly C, and so I have untagged as such.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is asking, "X code is wrong but appears to be working, why?" and you're answering, "X code is wrong - you need to use Y code." –  Chris Lutz Aug 2 '11 at 9:45
    
@Chris Lutz, ah.. Apologies. I went in to septic shock when I saw the code and it clouded my judgement. –  Moo-Juice Aug 2 '11 at 9:46
    
I've been there. I start seeing red when I see void main() –  Chris Lutz Aug 2 '11 at 9:48

You have to return the pointer in f() with the return statement, or else an illegal pointer will be returned:

char *f()
{   
    char *s=malloc(8);
    return s;
}
share|improve this answer
    
"...or else an illegal pointer will be returned" Where in the world does this come from? –  Chris Lutz Aug 2 '11 at 9:43
    
Probably from my bad use of a foreign language. But what exactly is wrong with that statement? –  Constantinius Aug 2 '11 at 9:52
    
That's not what happens, either according to the standard (which says undefined behavior) or in this real world example (the pointer from malloc is left over in the return register, effectively causing it to be returned from f as well). –  Chris Lutz Aug 2 '11 at 9:55

In your function, you return a pointer where you can assign stuff... ++a prevents it by returning const reference or instance. you can have the same behaviour if you have const char* f() { ... }.

Of course you could also implement ++a differently :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.