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At the moment this is what my code looks like:

if (!flipped){
    scaleX -= 0.1;
    if (scaleX < 0.0001){
      sounds.playSound("flick");
      flipped = true;
   }
 }

Here is what I'd like it to look like:

if (!flipped){
    scaleX -= 0.1;
    if (scaleX == 0){
      sounds.playSound("flick");
      flipped = true;
   }
 }

How can I achieve this? Because the double value (scaleX) is never actually 0.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You want to define some sort of tolerance, then do:

if (Math.abs(scaleX) < tolerance)

You shouldn't be checking for the value being exactly zero - just "close enough to zero". That's just a way of life with binary floating point types... things like "0.1" and "0.0001" aren't exactly representable in binary floating point, which is why you run into this sort of thing.

It's not clear why you don't like your original code, and why you want it to be the second form. Other than not taking the absolute value, the first code looks okay to me. (I'd extract out the constant, but that's a separate matter.)

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Thanks Jon, I just figured there might be a nice way around it because at the time I just coded it that way and thought to come back to it later. And here I am. :) But thanks, I'll extract the constant and stick to the "close enough to" approach. –  paranoid-android Aug 2 '11 at 10:01

You can't, because floating-point math can't produce exact results given that there are only 2^64 double values to represent an inifinity of numbers.

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When working with floating point arithmetic it's quite usual to write conceptually a "pretty close to" rather than equals.

 if ( x - y < verySmallValue )

rather than

 if ( x == y )

your y is 0, so you are writing

 if ( x < verySmallValue)

which I think is fine in concept.

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Depending on the usage of your variables, you may want to use the BigDecimal class.

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