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I have a table with data which I have to randomize. By randomizing, I mean use data from random row to update another row in that same column. Problem is that the table itself is big (more than 2 000 000 rows).

I wrote a piece of code which uses while loop, but it's going slow.

Does anyone have any suggestion about more efficient way of achieving randomization? Thx in advance.

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show us your code plz? –  Sherif elKhatib Aug 2 '11 at 10:26
    
Basically, I select all ID-s from my table into a temporary table, then select one ID from that table, find value from some random row and update it. After that I delete that ID from my temporary table. I generate random rows using 'code' SELECT TOP 1 MyColumn FROM MyTable where Id >= RAND() * NumberOfRowsInTable –  Milhad Aug 2 '11 at 10:36
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3 Answers 3

In order to update rows, there will be significant processsing time (CPU + I/O) from the updates.

Have you measured the relative expense of randomising the rows versus performing the updates?

In all you need to do is pick random rows, here's an efficient method to pick a random sample of rows (in this case 1% of the rows)

SELECT * FROM myTable
WHERE 0.01 >= CAST(CHECKSUM(NEWID(), pkID) & 0x7fffffff AS float) / CAST (0x7fffffff AS int)

where pkID is your primary key column.

This post might be of interest:

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I have private user data (First Name, Last Name, VIN etc.) in that table wich I want to shuffle so nobody can find true information and I can use that database for testing purposes. Randomizing entire rows is not going to help, I need full update of rows –  Milhad Aug 2 '11 at 10:42
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To shuffle data in 10 columns so that the 10 values per row are replaced with other values from other rows will be expensive.

You have to read 2 million rows 10 times.

The SELECT would be

SELECT
    FirstName, LastName, VIN, ...
FROM
    (SELECT FirstName FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) FirstName
    JOIN
    (SELECT LastName FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) LastName ON 1=1
    JOIN
    (SELECT VIN FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) VIN ON 1=1
    JOIN
    ...

I also wouldn't update, I'd create a new table

SELECT
    FirstName, LastName, VIN, ...
INTO
    StagingTable
FROM
    (SELECT FirstName FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) FirstName
    JOIN
    (SELECT LastName FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) LastName ON 1=1
    JOIN
    (SELECT VIN FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) VIN ON 1=1
    JOIN
    ...

Then add keys etc, drop the old table, rename it. Or use a SYNONYM to point to the new table

If you want to update, then I'd do it like this. or break it up into 10 updates .

UPDATE
   M
SET
   Firstname = FirstName.FirstName,
   LastName = LastName.LastName,
   ...
FROM
    MyTable M
    JOIN 
    (SELECT FirstName FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) FirstName ON 1=1
    JOIN
    (SELECT LastName FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) LastName ON 1=1
    JOIN
    (SELECT VIN FROM MyTable ORDER BY NEWID()) VIN ON 1=1
    JOIN
    ...
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In SQL Server 2008 (at least), those joins fail with error 1033: "The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived tables, subqueries, and common table expressions, unless TOP or FOR XML is also specified." –  T.J. Crowder Jan 9 at 10:00
    
@T.J.Crowder that's a different problem. Why use ORDER BY in a view anyway? –  gbn Jan 9 at 11:23
    
@ gbn: You used it in the joins above (ORDER BY NEWID()), presumably to get random-enough order when mixing things up. I was just trying to do precisely the update shown above, only change being table and column names. Eventually I managed to do it with a common table clause instead. Not efficient, but got the job done. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 9 at 11:27
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, there is no fast enough way to do this. At the end, I just cropped my table to 100K rows and then randomized the rows. For me, 100K rows is a representative number for test data. Thanks for your answers

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